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(2) THE TEACHINGS OF CHRIST.
Our Lord received all his instructions from Almighty God - 257, 341, 342, 344,

347, 437, 572.
Delivered all his doctrines and precepts, not in his own name, but as the Messenger

and Prophet of God, the anointed and inspired of the Father -- 61, 248-9, 257,

260, 296, 338, 365-6, 378.
Matt. v. 22. I say; the language of a divine messenger - 247.
Matt vii. 29. · He taught them as one having authority; authority from God to
deliver his message -

249.
Luke vi. 24. — Woe unto you. “Alas for you!" the warning of a prophet or
teacher - 297.

(3) THE MIRACLES OF CHRIST.
The subjects cured by Jesus, and others who witnessed his miracles, attributed

the power displayed, to God as the original author — 251, 252, 255, 296, 298,

299, 301, 322, 350, 359, 390.
Christ performed miracles, and indeed all his works while he was on earth, not as

Almighty God, but as a prophet; namely, by the assistance of the Father, or
by the spirit and power with which he was endowed -61, 261, 263, 299, 319,
332-3, 337, 338, 339, 344, 357-8, 360, 362, 364, 365-6, 363, 378, 379, 390,

392, 394, 402, 514.
Matt. viii. 3. I will, interpreted as indicating the divine mission of Jesus – 250.
Matt. viii. 26, 27. He rebuked the winds and the sea, by supernatural power

power received from God - 252.

(4) OTHER WORKS OF CHRIST.
Christ forgave sins, not as an eternal and omnipotent being, but as the agent, the

Prophet, and Son of God. The forgiveness of sins, in the Jewish sense of
the expression, equivalent to the removal of disorders, not to that of future

punishment — 253-5, 298-9, 382-3.
Christ commissioned the apostles to preach the gospel, and imparted the necessary

power, by the authority which he bad received from God — 382, 387, 390,

391, 402.
The salvation of men effected, and blessings imparted, by Christ, as the agent and

representative of God. 62, 339, 375, 433, 417, 451-2, 475, 508,510, 518,

520, 533, 535-6, 551, 578.
The Father, the primary cause of Christ's resurrection ; our Lord raised himself

by the power which he hard received. Probably, however, in John ii. 19—21;
x. 17, 18, he meant merely to declare that his life would be resumed - 320, 352,

comp. 200.
God the Father the efficient cause of Christ's ascension and glory. Our Lord's

regal and ecclesiastical authority, as the King and Head of his church, not
absolutely supreme. Christ, as conducting his mediatorial kingdom, inferior
to the Sovereign of the universe — 61, 173, 271, 276, 390-1, 394, 401, 401,

414, 444, 457, 464, 485, 521, 525-6, 531-2, 579-80.
Christ will raise the dead by the power with which he is invested by the Father -

330, 336, 394, 486,
Christ, as man, furnished by the Father with divine power and authority to

judge the world --- 333-4, 336, 400, 428, 580.

11. Christ not possessing Two Natures.
The Holy Scripture does not expressly assert that Christ is very God and very

man in one and the same person -- 51, 54.
The hypostatical union not proved by the miraculous conception of Jesus Christ -

232-3, 291.
Gen. iv. l. - A man Jehovah ; a rendering harsh and forced, whimsical and extra-

vagant 104-6.
2 Sam. vii. 19. 1 Chron. xvii. 17. — Applied to David. A man who is Lord
God: beware, O tyro, how you thus interpret.

149, 153.
Ps. Ixxxvii. 5. -- This and that man. No reference liere made to a double nature

in the person of Christ - 171.
Mic. v.2. His goings-forth. To interpret this as iniplying the union of a divine

with a human nature, involves an absurdity — 218.
Zech. xiii. 7.- The man, my fellow. Judas Maccabeus; or, the teachers of God's

people - 225-6.
Jolin xiv. 28. — Absurd to suppose, that Jesus speaks sometimes as God, and

sometimes as man 370.

12. Christ not Equal to the Father.
Our Lord received his being and perfections from the Father — 27, 35, 58–62,

369-71.
Ps, ii. 3. - Ask of me, and I shall give. Not“ Demand of me," &c. — 161.
Zech. xiii. 7. — My fellow ; a mistranslation. Equality not implied — 225-7.
Johu v. 18.- Making himself equul with God. Not the words of the evangelist,

but the accusation of his enemies, rebutted by Jesus when he declared that the

Son could do nothing of himself - 331-2.
John v. 19. — These also doth the Son likewise, similarly — 333.
John v. 23. - Honour the Son, even as they honour the Futher. The Greek work

rendered “even as” variously interpreted; but not signifying equality — 334.
Jobn xvi, 15. — All things that the Father hath are mine. Spoken as Teacher

and Mediatur, not as God — 373.
Johin xvii. 24. – I will; meaning, “I would, desire, pray.” The argument for

equality, an argument of straw — 380-1.
Phil. ii. 6. — Thought it not robbery to be equal with God; a false rendering.

The Unitarian interpretation, that of a vast majority of the most learned critics
and commentators — 478-81.

13. Christ not Identical with the Father - does not possess the same

Essence as God.
The consubstantiality of the Son with the Father not clearly set forth in Scripture,

and cannot be determined without the authority of the church — 54.
Zech. xii. 10, comp. John xix. 37.-- They shall look on me whom they have pierced ;

a false reading. If genuine, interpreted, “ God pierced through the wounds of

bis Son."-223-4, 381-2.
John viii. 24, 28, 58. — I am. To interpret this of Christ's divine essence, very

- 345, 346, 349.
John x. 30; xvii. 9-11, 22, 23. I and the Father are one, not in nature, but in

power or consent. A moral, not an essential union -- 353-6, 379-80.

erroneous

Jolin xiv. 9, 10, 11. -- He that hath seen me hath seen the Father. Not a truly

divine identity, but a moral unity or resemblance — 364-6.
Rom. i. 4. - The spirit of holiness; the divine power by which Christ was sanc-

tified ; not his divine nature - 414-5.
1 Cor. xv. 45. — A quickening spirit, not referring to Christ's divine essence -

445, 540.
2 Cor. iv. 4. Col. i. 15. Heb. i. 3. - The image of the invisible God, &c.; phrases

baving a moral signification, not mystical or metaphysical — 450-1, 487-9, 523-5.
Phil. ii. 6. — The form of God, not signifying the nature of the Deity - 476-8.
Col. ii. 9. - In him dwelleth all the fulness of the Godheud bodily. Interpreted of

the fulness of the gifts wbich Christ received from God, or of his complete know-
ledge of the divine will; or of Christianity itself as opposed to Judaism –500-2,

comp. 467-8, 496.
1 John v. 7.— The Word one with the Father. By the most learned commentators

interpreted, not of essence, but of consent 559-61.

14. Christ not an object of Religious Worship.
The practice of many Trinitarians to worship God, without any reference to a

distinction of persons, to worship the Father alone, or at least but seldom 10
address the Son in prayer-

40-1, 63-7, 416.
Christ prayed only to the Father — 63, 273, 274, 297, 376, 538.
No two ideas more opposite in conception than that of a suppliant, and that of a

giver — 273.
Christ instructed his followers to worship only the Father. The Lord's Prayer

Unitarian, and wanting in the essentials of orthodoxy - 247-8.
Jesus desired his followers to have recourse, in their difficulties, not to him, but to

bis Father 373-4.
The apostles paid divine or supreme worship to the Father only 416-7.
Josh. v. 14. - Joshua did worship, respect, not religious veneration, to the captain

of the host of Jehovah ; namely, to an angel — 141.
Ps. ii. 12. Kiss the Son. Embrace his discipline, do homage to God's vice-

gerent — 162.
Ps. ii. 12. Matt. xii. 21. - Putting trust in the Son, or in his name. Embracing

his religion. He wlio confides in Jesus Christ confides also in God — 162, 260,

cump. 207.

Matt. ii. 2, et al. - The worship of Christ, while on earth. civil respect, not

religious homage 237-9, 249, 256, 263, 269, 350, comp. 110-11, 141, 153,

168, 210.
Matt. xxviii. 19, et al. Baptizing into the name of Christ, or baptizing into

Christ; a phrase not necessarily implying religious worship, but expressive of

a belief in the religion instituted by the Messiah — 277-9.
John v. 23. — All men should honour the Son as they honour the Father. The Son

to be honoured as the ambassador of God the Father, the Being who commis-

sioned him — 334-5.
Acts ii. 21 ; ix. 14, 21 ; xxii. 16. Rom. x. 12, 13. 1 Cor. i. 2. To call on the

name of the Lord signifies, either to worship God, or to acknowledge Jesus as

the Messiali, to profess one's-self a Christian — 389, 400, 410, 428, 431.
Acts vii. 59. — Calling upon, and saying, Lord Jesus, &c. Not perforce an act

of religious adoration, an acknowledgment of Christ's Drity -- 397-8.

Rom. i. 7. 2 Cor. xiii. 14, et al. - Grace and peace, &c. The general mode of

commencing and concluding St. Paul's Epistles, not religious adoration, but
pious wishes. The blessings wished for directed towards the Father as their
fountain and originator, and towards the Son as the channel through which they

are conveyed - 415, 447, 455-6, 508.
Rom. ix. 1.- I say the truth in Christ: as a Christian. Not the formula of an

oath - 423.
2 Cor. xii. 8, 9.- I besought the Lord. Interpreted as a prayer to God; but

more properly as an address to Christ, when personally present to the apostle —

455, comp. 415.
1 Thess. iii. 11-13. 2 Thess. ii. 16. — God addressed as the original fountain of

the blessings invoked ; and Christ, as he who possessed delegated power to impart
these blessings. Pious wishes do not, however, always imply direct prayer-
504-5, 507; comp. 415, 573.
Tim. i. 12. – I thank Jesus Christ. Expressive of great olligation – 509.
Heb, xiii. 20, 21. 1 Pet. iv. 11. To whom be glory. Ambiguous whether

directed to God or to Christ. Interpreted, however, by many Trinitarians, as

ascriptions of praise to the Father - 545, 550.
1 John v. 14, 15. — He heareth us. God, not Christ, heareth us 565.
Rev. v. 9–13, et al. - Thou art worthy, &c. Christ addressed, not as God, but

as a being who had been slain 578-9.

15. No suficient Argument for the Deity of Christ drawn from those

Texts which seem to assert or imply his Pre-existence.

Gen. xiv. 18. Heb. vii. I. Melchisedek was not Christ

108, 539.
Gen, xvi. 7, et al. A deficiency of evidence to prove that Christ was the angel

of Jehovah mentioned so frequently in the Old Testament. Many Trinitarians
decidedly opposed to this opinion, either in application to special appearances,
or to the whole of them -- 108, 122-3, 126-8, 130, 133, 141, 144, 216, 221-2,

396-7, 521.
Ps. xl. 7, 8. Heb. x. 7. - Lo, I come. The words of the prophet himself; or a

prophetic anticipation of what the Messiah would say - 164, 542.
Ps. cx. 1. Matt. xxii. 44. Jehovah said unto my Lord ; that is, he will

say 173, 270-1.
John i. 15, 30. He was before me; superior in dignity 315-7.
John iji. 2, 13, 31; vi. 38, 51; vii. 28, 29; viii, 42 ; xi. 27 ; xii. 3; xri, 27–30;

xvii. 8; xviii. 37. Proceedeth forth and came from God; came down from
heaven ; from above; into the world, &c. interpreted of a divine commission, or
of moral qualities — 322, 325, 328, 339, 340, 342-3, 344-5, 347, 359, 362,374.5,

378, 381.
John vi. 62. — Ascend where he was before, in the divine decree. Perhaps an allu-

sion to the impersonal Logos; or an indication of Christ's knowledge of sublime

and heavenly doctrines - 341.
Jolin viii. 58. — Before Abraham was, I was, namely as the Messiah, in the divine

decree 349.
John xvii. 5. - The glory which I had with thee before the world was, in the

divine decree. Christ spake as Mediator, not as God - 376-8.

John xvii. 24. - For thou loredst me before the foundation of the world. Similar

language applied to Christians as well as to the Saviour - 381.
Rom. viii. 3. Gal. iv. 4. — God sending his own Son, expressive of divine com-

mission — 417, 458.9.
1 Cor. xv. 47. The Lord from heaven; that is, heavenly, possessing the qualities

of incorruption and immortality; or, will be from heaven. The Lord probably

an interpolation. Soine conceive that Christ is not meant here 446.
2 Cor. viii. 9. He became poor. Was poor as regards his worldly circumstances,

whilst he was at the same time rich in miraculous gifts — 453-4.
Eph. iv. 9.– He descended into the lower parts of the earth; into the tomb, or into

hades - 470.
Phil. ii. 6. Being in the form of God. The use of the participle being does not

afford an unexceptionable argument for pre-existence - 476.
Phil. ii. 7, 8. – Took upon him the form of a servant, and other expressions,

resolvable not into Christ's assumption of buman nature, but into his appearance
as a slave, and as a common or ordinary man ; whilst, in respect to character and

offices, he was greatly superior — 482-3.
Col. i. 17. - He is before all things: prior in excellence — 494-5.
Heb. ii. 14. - He took part of flesh and blood; participated of human nature, in

the same manner as other buman beings — 534.
Heb. ii. 16. He took not on him the nature of angels, &c.; a great error. The

correct rendering : “He did not assist angels, but,” &c. — 534-5.
Heb. ii. 17. - In all things it behoved him to be made like unto his brethren. It

was necessary that in all respects he should be like his brethren - 535.
Heb. xi. 26. The reproach of Christ; reproaches similar to those which Christ

was to endure. The word “ Christ” may signify the Hebrew people — 543.
1 Pet. i. 11. - The spirit of Christ which was in the prophets ; the spirit by which

the prophets were inspired, and which afterwards dwelt in Christ; or the spirit

by which they foretold the sufferings of Christ - 548.
1 Pet. iii. 19, 20.- By which he preached to the spirits in prison, who sometime

were disobedient, &c. Explained so as not to involve the notion of Christ's

pre-existence – 519-50.
1 John iv. 2, 3. That Jesus Christ is come in the flesh. Rather, “ Jesus Christ

who is come in the flesh,” who is a real man ; said in opposition to the false
opinions of the age - 556-7.

III. —THE HOLY SPIRIT NOT THE THIRD PERSON IN THE

GOD HEAD.

The Father alone self-existent and unoriginated — 59, 60.
The Deity of the Holy Ghost, and his eternal procession from the Father and the

Son, not laid down in Scripture - 40, 53-55, 372, 373, 395, 449, 459.
Suppposing that the doctrine of the Nicene and Athanasian Creeds, respectiog

the procession of the Spirit, and his subordination to the Father and the Son,

were true, it would destroy liis proper equality — 35, 59, 60.
The Holy Ghost never in Scripture called God — 51, 53, 395.
That he should be advised, not clearly set forth in Scripture — 54.
He should never be addressed in prayer — 63.

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