The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal, Volume 169

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A. Constable, 1889

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Page 430 - Paradise, and groves Elysian, Fortunate Fields — like those of old Sought in the Atlantic Main, why should they be A history only of departed things, Or a mere fiction of what never was? For the discerning intellect of Man, When wedded to this goodly universe In love and holy passion, shall find these A simple produce of the common day.
Page 441 - Prophets of Nature, we to them will speak A lasting inspiration, sanctified By reason, blest by faith: what we have loved, Others will love, and we will teach them how; Instruct them how the mind of man becomes A thousand times more beautiful than the earth On which he dwells...
Page 447 - Of Truth, of Grandeur, Beauty, Love, and Hope, And melancholy Fear subdued by Faith ; Of blessed consolations in distress ; Of moral strength, and intellectual Power ; Of joy in widest commonalty spread...
Page 417 - I trust is their destiny, to console the afflicted, to add sunshine to daylight by making the happy happier, to teach the young and the gracious of every age, to see, to think and feel, and therefore to become more actively and securely virtuous...
Page 417 - It is an awful truth, that there neither is, nor can be, any genuine enjoyment of Poetry among nineteen out of twenty of those persons who live, or wish to live, in the broad light of the world — among those who either are, or are striving to make themselves, people of consideration in society.
Page 385 - We are told that there was no malice, and that the prisoner must have been in liquor. In liquor ! Why, he was drunk ! And yet he murdered the very man who had been drinking with him ! They had been carousing the whole night ; and yet he stabbed him ; after drinking a whole bottle of rum with him ; Good God, my Laards, if he will do this when he's drunk, what will he not do when he's sober ? " His love of children was warm-hearted and unaffected.
Page 396 - State by law established, or to point out, in order to their removal, matters which are producing, or have a tendency to produce, feelings of hatred and ill-will between classes of Her Majesty's subjects, is not a seditious intention.
Page 446 - His desperate course of tumult and of glee. That which in stealth by Nature was performed Hath Reason sanctioned ; her deliberate Voice Hath said ; be mild, and cleave to gentle things, Thy glory and thy happiness be there.
Page 382 - Stewart was one of the greatest of didactic orators. Had he lived in ancient times, his memory would have descended to us as that of one of the finest of the old eloquent sages.
Page 440 - Early had he learned To reverence the volume that displays The mystery, the life which cannot die ; But in the mountains did he feel his faith.

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