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241

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EPIGRAMS TRANSLATED FROM ANTIPATER SIDONIUS.

To Julia weeping

Around the tomb, oh bard divine!

237 Song

Here sleeps Anacreon, in this ivied shade ib.

The Shield

Oh stranger! if Anacreon's shell

238

To Mrs

At length thy golden hours have wing'd their

Elegiac Suanzas

flight

ib.

Fanny of Timmol

LITTLE'S POEMS.

A Night-thought

Elegiac Suanzas :

Preface

239

The Kiss.

Dedication

240

To

To Julia

A Reflection at Sea .

To a Lady, with some manuscript poems

An Invitation to Supper

To Mrs

ib.

An ode upon morning.

To the large and beautiful Miss

ib.

Song

To Julia

ib.

Come, tell me where the maid is found

laconstancy

242

Sweetest love! I'll not forget thee

Imitation of Catullus.

ib.

If I swear by that eye

Epigram

ib.

Julia's Kiss

To Julia

ib.

To

Song

ib.

Fly from the world, O Bessy! to me

Nature's Labels

2.43

Think on that look of humid ray

To Mrs M-

ib.

A captive thus to thee.

Song

The Catalogue

To Julia

ib.

A Fragment.

Impromptu

Where is the nymph

To Rosa

When time who steals our years away

Sympathy

ib.

The Shrine.

To Julia

ib.

Reuben and Rose .

To Mrs

ib.

The Ring -

On the Death of a Lady

ib.

Of all my happiest hours of joy

To Julia

ib.

To a boy with a watch

Το

245

Fragments of College exercises .

Written in the blank leaf of a Lady's com-

Mary, I believed thee true

mon-place book

ib.

Why does azure deck the sky

ib.

To Rosa

Morality, a

a familiar epistle

ib.

The Natal Genius, a dream .
To Ditto

ib.
Rondeau

ib. THE LOVES OF THE ANGELS, PREFACE, etc.
An Argument to any Phillis or Chloe

ib.

Notes, ..
To Rosa

246
Anacreontique

ib. IRISH MELODIES. --No. J.
Ditto

ib. Advertisement to the First and Second Num-

Oh, woman, if by simple wile

ib.

bers

Love and Marriage .

ib. Go where glory waits thee

The Kiss

247 Remember the glories of Briea the brave .

To Miss

ib. Erin! the tear and the smile in thine eyes

Nonsense.

ib. Oh! breathe not his name, let it sleep in

To Julia, on her birth-day

ib.

the shade

Elegiac Stanzas

ib. When he who adores thee lias left but the

To Rosa

ib.

naine.

Love in a Storm

248 The harp that once through Tara's halls

Song

ib. Fly not yet, 't is just the hour.

The Surprise .

ib. Oh! think not my spirits are always as light

To a sleeping maid

ib.

Though the last glimpse of Eriu with sorrow

To Phillis.

I see

Song

248 Rich and rare were the gems she wore

The Ballad

ib. As a beam o'er the face of the waters may

To Mrs -, on her translation of Voi-

glow ...

ture's Kiss

ib.

There is not in the wide world a valley so sweet

To a Lady, on her Singing

249

A Dream.

Written in a common-place book

Oh! haste and leave this sacred isle .

To the pretty little Mrs

How dear to me the hour wien daylight dies

Song

ib. Take back the virgin page

The Tear

ib. When in death I shall calm recline

To---

ib. How oft has the Benshee cried

263

279

ib.

Page.

We may roam through this world, like a child No. VI.

at a feast

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Oh! weep for the hour

ib.

Come o'er the sea

Let Erin remember the days of old

ib. Has sorrow thy young days shaded .

Silent, oh Moyle! be the roar of thy water 289 No, not more welcome the fairy numbers

Come, send round the wine, and leave points

When first I met thee, warm and young

of belief

ib. While History's muse the memorial was keep-

Sublime was the warning which Liberty

ing

spoke

ib. The time I've lost in wooing

Believe

me,

if all those endearing young

Where is the slave, so lowly

charms

ib. Come, rest in this bosom, my own stricken

No. III.

deer!

Letter to the Marchioness Dowager of Do-

'T is gone, and for ever, the light we saw

negal

290

breaking

Like the bright lamp that shope in Kildare's

I saw from the beach, when the morning

holy fane

292

was shining

Drink to her, who long

293

Fill the bumper fair!

Oh! blame not the bard, if he fly to the

Dear harp of my country! in darkness I found

bowers

ib.

thee.

While gazing on the moon's light

ib. | No. VII.

When daylight was yet sleeping under the

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billow

294 My gentle harp! once more I waken

By the hope, within us springing

ib. As slow our ship ber foamy track

Night closed around the conqueror's way

ib. Jo the morning of life, when its cares are

Oh! 't is sweet to think, that, where'er we

unknown.

ib. When cold in the earth lies the friend thou

Through grief and through danger

hast loved

When through life unbless'd we rove

ib.

Remember thee! yes, while there's life in

It is not the tear at this moment shed

ib.

this heart

'T is believed that this harp, which I wake

Wreathe the bowl

ib. Whene'er I see those smiling eyes

No. IV.

If thou 'lt be mine, the treasures of air

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296 To ladies' eyes a round, boy

Oh! the days are gone, when beauty bright ib.

Forget dot the field where they perish'd

Though dark are our sorrows, to-day we'll

They may rail at this life-from the hour

forget them

ib.

I began it

Weep on, weep on, your hour is past

297 Oh for the swords of former time!

Lesbia hath a beaming eye

ib.

No. VIII.

I saw thy form in youthful prime

ib.

Ne'er ask the hour-what is it to us

By that lake, whose gloomy shore

298

sail

She is far from the land where her young

on, thou fearless bark

Yes, sad one of Sion-if closely resembling

hero sleeps .

ib.

Drink of this cup-you'll find there's a spell

Nay, tell me not, dear, that the goblet drowns ib.

in

Avenging and bright fall the swift sword of

Down in the valley come meet me 10-night

Erin

ib.

What the bee is to the floweret

Oh, ye dead! oh, ye dead! whom we know

299

Of all the fair months that round the sun.

Here we dwell, in holiest bowers

ib.

How sweet the answer Echo makes .

This life is all chequer'd with pleasures and

ib.

Oh, banquet not in those shining bowers

woes

No. V.

The dawning of morn, the daylight's sinking

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ib. Shall the harp then be silent, when he who

Through Erin's isle

300

Al the 'mid hour of night, when stars are

Oh, the sight entrancing

weeping

ib. No. IX.

One bumper at parting !--though many

ab. Sweet lonisfallen, fare thee well

"T is the last rose of summer .

'T was one of those dreams that by music

The young May-moon is beaming, love

are brought

The minstrel-boy to the war is gone

ib. Fairest! put on a while

The valley lay smiling before me

ib. Quick! we have but a second

Oh! had we some bright little isle of our

And doth not a meeting like this make

302

amends

Farewell ! - but whenever you welcome the

In yonder valley there dwelt, alone

hour

ib. As vanquished Erin wept beside

Oh! doubt me not--the season

ib. By the Feal's wave benighted

You remember Ellen, our hamlet's pride. ib. They kuow not my heart

Td mourn the hopes that leave me

ib.

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303 I wish I was by that dim lake

ib.

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She sung of love, while o'er her lyre .

317

Sing, sing, music was given

ib

NATIONAL AIRS.-No. I.

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ib.

A temple to Friendship.-Spanish Air 318

Flow on, thou shining river.-Portuguese

Air ..

ib.

All that 's bright must fade.--Indian Air ib.

So warmly we met.-Hungarian Air

ib.

Those evening bells.-Air, The Bells of St

Petersburgh

ib.

Should those fond hopes.- Portuguese Air ib.

Reason, Folly, and Beauty.- Italian Air . 319

Fare thee well, thou lovely one!-Sicilian

Air ..!

ib.

Dost thou remember ?- Portuguese Air ib.

Oh! come to me when daylight sets.-Ve-

netian Air .

ib.

Oft, in the stilly night.-Scotch Air

320

Hark! the vesper hymn is stealing.- Russian

Air

ib.

No. II.

Love and Hope.-Swiss Air . ,

ib.

There comes a time.-German Air

My harp has one unchanging theme.-Swe-

dish Air..

ib.

Oh! no-pot e'n when first we loved. ---Cash-

merian Air

321

Peice be around thee !--Scotch Air

ib

Common Sense and Genius.--French Air ib.

Then, fare thee well-Ou English Air.

Gaily sounds the castanet.- Maltese Air ib.

Love is a hunter-boy.--Languedocian Air 322

Come, chase that starting tear away.-- French

Air

ib.

Joys of youth, how fleeting !--Portuguese

dir

ib.

Hear me but once.-

French Air

ib.

No. III.

When Love was 'a child.-Swedish Air ib.

Say, what shall be our sport to-day?--Sici-

lian dir

323

Bright be thy dreams!—Welsh Air

ib.

Go, then-'t is vain.-Sicilian Air

ib.

The crystal hunters.-Swiss Air

ib.

Row gently here.- Venetian Air

ib.

Oh! the days of youth.--- French Air

ib.

When 6rst that smile.-Venetian Air . 324

Peace to the slumberers!--Catalonian Air . ib.

When thou shalt wander.-Sicilian Air. ib.

Who'll buy my love-knots?—Portuguese Air ib.

See, the dawn from Heaven.-Sung at

Riome on Christmas Eve .

ib.

No. IV.

Nets and cages.-Swedish Air .

325

When through the piazzetta. ---Venetian Air ib.

Go, now, and dream. --Sicilian Air

ib.

Take hence the bowl. - Neapolitan Air ib.

Farewell, Theresa - Venetian Air

325

How oft, when watching stars.--Savoyard

Air

326

When the first summer bee.--German Air ib.

Though 't is all but a dream.- French Air. ib.

'Tis when the cup is smiling.- Italian Air ib.

Page.

Where shall we bury our shame?-Neapoli-

tan Air

326

Ne'er talk of Wisdom's gloomy schools.-

Mahratta dir

ib.

Here sleeps the bard.-Highland Air 327

SACRED SONGS. No, I.

Thou art, oh God! .

327

This world is all a fleeting show.

ib.

Fallen is thy throne

ib.

Who is the maid !

328

The bird, let loose .

ib.

Oh! Thou who dry'st the mourner's tear ib.

Weep not for those .

329

The turf shall be my fragrant shrine

ib.

Sound the loud timbrel.

ib.

Go, let me weep

ib.

Come not, oh Lord !

330

Were not the sinful Mary's tears

ib.

As down in the sunless retreats

ib.

But who shall see!.

ib.

Almighty God !-Chorus of priests

ib.

Oh, fair! oh, purest

331

No. II.

Angel of Charity

ib.

Behold the sun

ib.

Lord, who shall bear that day!

ib.

Oh! teach me to love thee

332

Weep, children of Israel

ib.

Like morning, when ber early breeze

ib.

Come, ye disconsolate

ib,

Awake, arise, thy light is come

ib.

There is a bleak desert

333

Since first thy word

ib.

Hark! 't is the breeze.

ib.

Where is your dwelling, ye sainted ? 334

How lightly mounts the Muse's wing

ib.

Go forth to the mount

ib. .

Is it not sweet to think, hereafter?

ib.

War against Babylon.

335

BALLADS, SONGS, etc.

Black and Blue Eyes

ib.

Cease, oh cease to tempt!

ib.

Dear Fanny

ib.

Did not

336

Fanny, dearest!

ib.

Fanny was in the grove

ib.

From life without freedom

ib.

Here's the bower

ib.

Holy be the pilgrim's sleep

337

I can no longer suifle

ib.

I saw the moon rise clear

ib.

Joys that pass away

ib.

Light sounds the harp

ib.

Little Mary's eye

338

Love and the Sun-Dial

ib.

Love and Time

ib. .

Love, my Mary, dwells with thee

ib

Love's light summer-cloud .

339

Love wand'ring through the golden maze ib.

Merrily every bosom boundeth.

ik

Now let the warrior

ib.

Oh, lady fair!, .

ib.

Oh! remember the time

Oh! see those cherries

340

Oh! soon return

ib.
ib.

ib.

380

il,

ib.

381

ib.

OF

THOMAS MOORE, ESQ.

COMPRISING ANECDOTES OF ANCIENT MINSTRELSY, ILLUSTRATIVE OF THE

4 TRISI MELODIES. »

BY J. W. LAKE.

NOTWITHSTANDING the number of literary men to Had Mr Moore done no more than this, he whom Ireland has given birth, there is very little would be entitled to the gratitude of his counconnected with their names which conveys to us trymen; but his gevius, like his own Peri, seems any thing of a national association ; for the land never pleased, but while hovering over the reof their nativity scarcely enjoys a single ray of gion he loves; or if it makes a short excursion, that brilliant mind, which sheds its intellectual it is only in the hope of securing some advantage brightness over the sister country. Congreve was that may accelerate the removal of those disqnaan apostate, and Swift only by accident a patriot; lifications, which are supposed to exclude happiness whilst Goldsmith was weak enough to affect an from the limits of his country. In • Lalla Rookh. air of contempt for a people whose accent was he has given his fire-worshippers the wrongs and indelibly stamped on his tongue. We could pro- feelings of Irishmen; while, in the « Memoirs of tract the list of her ungrateful and thoughtless Captain Rock,» he has accomplished a most diffi. men of mind, even to our own day; but the cult task — written a history of Ireland that has task would be invidious, and we gladly turn from been read. it to one who forms a splendid exception-one On such grounds we may well claim for Mr who is not ashamed of Ireland, and of whom Iro- Moore what he deserves--the crown of patriotism; land is justly proud.

but it is not on this head alone he is entitled to Land of the Muse ! in glory's lay,

our praise. As a poet, since the lamented death In history's leaf thy name shall soar, of Byron, he stands al.post without a competitor; When, like a meteor's noxious ray, and as a prose-writer, he is highly respectable.

The reign of tyranny is o'er ;
Immortal names have honour'd thee-

Mr Moore is the only son of the late Mr Garret
A Sheridan, a Wellesley:

Moore, formerly a respectable tradesman in DubAnd still is beaming round thy sbore lin, where our poet was born on the 28th of May, The spirit bright of Liberty,

1780. He has two sisters; and his infantine days For thou canst boast a patriot, Moore !

seem to have left the most agreeable impressions Mr Moore is every way an Irishman, in heart, on his memory. In an epistle to his eldest sisin feelings, and in principles. For his country ter, dated November, 1803, and written from he has done more than any man living: he has Norfolk in Virginia, he retraces with delight their associated her name, her wrongs, and her attri- childhood, and describes the endearments of butes, with poetry and music, peither of which home, with a sensibility as exquisite as that which can ever die, while taste, patriotisin, and literature breathes through the lines of Cowper on receivsubsist in the world; and whilst these survive, ing his mother's picture. Ireland will forin the theme of Beauty's song, and He acquired the rudiments of an excellent Irish music the charm of every cultivated mind. education under the care of the late Mr Samuel But, all extrinsic circumstances apart, there is in Whyte, of Grafton-street, Dublin, a gentleman the melodies of Mr Moore a sacred fire, which cov- extensively known and respected as the early tuveys its vividness to the soul of his readers; and tor of Sheridan. He eviuced such talent in early ihey must be made of sterner stuff than the ordi- life, as determined his father to give him the adnary race of men, if their bosoms do not glow with vantages of a superior education, and at the early liberal and patriotic enthusiasm, while they pe- age of fourteen, he was entered a student of Triruse the harmonious creations of a poet who has nity College, Dublin. clothed the wild and eccentric airs of his coun- Mr Moore was greatly distinguished while at try in words that burn, and sentiments that find the University, by an enthusiastic attachment to an echo in every generous breast.

the liberty and independence of his country,

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