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ccxxxi.

OFT IN THE STILLY NIGHT.

Oft in the stilly night,

Ere slumber's chain has bound me,
Fond mem'ry brings the light
• Of other days around me.
The smiles, the tears,
Of boy-hood's years,

The words of love then spoken,
The eyes that shone,
Now dimm'd and gone,

The cheerful vow now broken.
Thus in the stilly night,

Ere slumber's chain has bound me, Sad mem'ry brings the light

Of other days around me.

When I remember all

The friends so linked together, I've seen around me fall,

Like leaves in wintry weather,

I feel like one
Who treads alone

Some banquet hall deserted,
Whose lights are fled,
Whose garlands dead,

And all but me departed.
Thus in the stilly night,

Ere slumber's chain has bound me,
Sad mem'ry brings the light

Of other days around me.

CCXXXII.

THOUGH YON FAREWEEL MAY BE THE LAST.

AIR-Thou’rt gane awa'.

Though yon fareweel may be the last,

When I took leave o' thee, Katy;
I'll mind you when lang years hae past

Will you remember me, Katy?
When tost upon the raging main,

As loud the wild storms blow, Katy;
O! wha will cheer the trying scene,

When thou art far awa', Katy ?,

I wish we twa had never met,

My heart had ne'er been sair, Katy ; I ne'er will that sad thought forget,

“ We'll maybe meet nae mair, Katy." My widow'd heart is lanely now,

Tho' ance frae sorrow free, Katy, But it will keep its warmest vow,

Ne'er to love ane but thee, Katy.

O! ance I form’d the fond, fond thought,

That we wad live in bliss, Katy,
And meet the joy we sweetly sought,

And no a fate like this, Katy.
We then had pass'd our hours wi' glee,

Nae sorrow dar'd attend, Katy ;
Thou'd been my life-my a' to me,

My sweetheart and my friend, Katy.

When stretch'd upon a friendless bed,

Pain writhes this frame o' mine, Katy, I'll sigh- I canna lay my head

Ou ony breast but thine, Katy. I'll suffer sairly Love's keen powers,

And mourn the joy that's gane, Katy; For nane can cheer my lanely hours,

But you, and you alane, Katy.

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But aye this hope will warm my heart,

That you will aye be true, Katy ;
We'll may be meet nae mair to part-

But 'tis a lang adieu, Katy.

CCXXXIII.

THIS BOTTLE'S THE SUN OF OUR TABLE.

This bottle's the Sun of our table,

His beams are rosy wine ;
We-planets, that are not able

Without his help to shine.

Let mirth and glee abound,

You'll soon grow bright

With borrow'd light,
And shine as he goes round.

CCXXXIV.

THE SONG THAT LIGHTENS THE LANGUID

WAY.

The celebrated Boat Glee.

The
song

that lightens the languid way,
When brows are glowing,

And faint with rowing,
Is like the spell of hope's airy lay,
To whose sound thro' life we stray.
The beam's that flash on the oar awhile,

As we row along thro' waves so clear,
Illume its spray, like the fleeting smile

That shines on sorrow's tear.

Nothing is lost on him, who sees

With an eye that fecling gave;
For him there's a story in every breeze,

And a picture in every wave.
Then sing, to lighten the languid way;

When brows are glowing,

And faint with rowing,
'Tis like the spell of hope's airy lay,
To whose sound thro’ life we stray.

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