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Forms that the night of years conceal'd,
As by a flash, are here reveald;
Chiefs, who sung the victor song,
Scepter'd kings, a shadowy throng! ..
From slumber of three thousand years
Each as in life and light appears,
Stern as of yore! Yes, Vision vast,
Three thousand years have silent pass'd,
Suns of Empire risen and set,
(Whose story Time can ne'er forget,)
Since, in the morning of her pride,
Immense, along the Nile's green side,
The City of the Sun appear'd,
And her gigantic image rear'd.

As her own Memnon, like a trembling string,
When the Sun, with rising ray
Streaked the lonely desert gray,
Sent forth its magic murmuring,
That just was heard, then died away;
So pass'd, oh Thebes! thy morning pride.
THY GLORY WAS THE SOUND THAT DIED!

Dark city of the desolate,
Once thou wert rich, and proud, and great.
This busy-peopled isle was then,
A waste, or roam’d by savage men,
Whose gay descendants now appear
To gaze upon thy wreck of glory here.

PHANTOM of that city old,
Whose mystic spoils we now behold,
A kingdom's sepulchre oh say,
Shall Albion's own illustrious day,
Thus darkly, close ? her power, her fame
Thus pass away, a shade, a name!

.' Thebes.

The Mausoleum murmur'd as I spoke.
A spectre seem'd to rise, like tow'ring smoke. i
It answer'd not, but pointed as it fled,
To the black carcase of the sightless dead."

Once more I heard the sounds of earthly strife, And the streets ringing to the stir of life.

The mummy.

May 19th.

W. L. B.

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TO PROMOTE A PURE, SPEEDY, AND CHEAP,

ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE.

By J. T. BARBER BEAUMONT, Esq., F. A.S.

ONE OF HIS MAJESTY'S JUSTICES OF THE PEACE FOR

MIDDLESEX AND WESTMINSTER.

Continued from the last No.

LONDON:

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NO. XXXVI. 2C

AN

ESSAY

ON

CRIMINAL JURISPRUDENCE.

15. The only essential parts of a penal law are the name and definition of the thing forbidden, and the penalty attached to it: the fewer words in which these things can be clearly and correctly expressed, the better.

16. In legal proceedings as well as in laws, all verbiage that can be properly avoided ought to be prohibited, as increasing the expenses of legal proceedings, occupying the time of courts and parties unnecessarily, and clouding the essential points of the case at issue.

17. In framing laws, words not generally known ought to be avoided, because the description of the laws ought to come within the scope of every man's understanding, who is to be guided by them.

18. Immaterial distinctions in laws ought to be avoided; they are productive of cavils, evasions, and uncertainty.

19. Kindred offences, incurring similar penalties, ought to be embraced in general and simplified laws as much as possible.

20. Uncertain and ambiguous expressions in laws and legal proceedings, ought to be primarily defined.

21. Legal provisions frequently occurring, ought to be set forth fully once, and then be referred to or described by a short erpression. By this expedient a great deal of verbosity and tautology may be avoided.

22. Laws ought to be arranged so as to exhibit crimes of each particular class, from their first steps to their last stages. By such means a striking moral picture may be presented, of the fatal terminations to which indulgence in any particular vice gradually leads : these increasing steps of transgression, and

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