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During the last war, the quantity of nitre produced exceeded 400,000 pounds a year, and that of gunpowder 300,000 pounds. * The produce of salt-works is more than equal to the consumption.

Products of Vegetable Substances. 2,000 Distilleries,

2,220,773 gallons, 740,242 · Hemp,

5,755 tons, 690,600 Maple sugar, 2,471,647 lbs.

308,932 33 Fulling mills,

53,038 yds.

78,407 24,450 Looms,

4,685,375 yds. 2,057,081 6 Paper mills,

6,200 reams,

18,600 38 Rope walks,

1,991 tons cordage, 393,400 13 Cottonbay manufactory, 453,750 yds. 1,591,445 15 Spinning machines, 1,656 spindles. Manufactures of cotton wool and hemp have been established on a large scale in different towns, with machinery driven by steam. In 1815 there were six steam mills in operation at Washington; two for grain, one for cotton, one for wool, and another for other purposes. At Lexington there is a woollen and a cotton manufactory, on an extensive scale, employing 150 hands each, and several of smaller size; an oil cloth and carpet manufactory; a steam rope manufactory; four nail factories, which make sevenly tons of nails yearly. Two copper and tin manufactories, three steam grist-mills, three steam paper-mills, several rope-walks and bagging manufactories, which consume 14,000 tons of hemp yearly. The manufactures of hemp at Lexington, in 1811, were valued at 900,000 dollars.

The whole amount of manufactures, in 1810, was

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estimated at 6,181,024 dollars, besides the doubtful articles, valued at 1,033,180, and consisting of maplesugar, saltpetre, &c. At Maysville there is a glass factory; at Paris, several cording machines ; at Danville, several mills, factories, and rope-walks ; at Frankfort, hemp manufactories, powder-mills, a grist and saw-mill; at Cynthiana, ten grist and sawmills; at Newport, an arsenal; at Louisville, se. veral manufactories ; at Shipping Port, a rope-walk, 1250 feet in length ; at Vaugeville, a salt manufactory, at which a bushel of salt is obtained from 300 gallons of water. Several large brigs have been built at Frankfort, and sent to New Orleans, and 500 hogsheads of tobacco have been shipped for the latter place in one year from the town of Henderson, on the Ohio river. In the month of September 1817, an association was formed at Lexington, for the encouragement of domestic manufactures.

- Commerce. The foreign commerce of this state is yet inconsiderable, owing to its great distance from the sea, and the consumption of its staple productions by new settlers. The exports consist chiefly of wheat, rye, barley, hemp, tobacco, live cattle, whisky, and peach brandy. The introduction of steam-boats has removed one of the great objections to this country as a place of residence. Other evils which existed about the year 1793, the uncertainty of land titles, the labours and dangers of the militia service, from Indian hostility, * have also ceased ; and the mildness

* Some information respecting America, collected by Thomas Cooper, late of Manchester. London, 1 vol. in 8vo, 1794, p. 24.

of the climate, with the great fertility of the soil, now overbalance all objections. Steam-boats, of 360 tons, ascend from New Orleans to Louisville, a distance of 2500 miles, in 25 days, and descend in eight or nine, with passengers, and freight, amounting to about 200 tons. Louisville, situated in latitude 38° 8' north, is now a port of entry.

Canals.- A company have been incorporated, for the purpose of running a canal along the rapids of Louisville, with a capital of 500,000 dollars. The descent in nine miles is twenty-two feet. The canal is to be two miles in length, sixteen in depth, twenty in width below, sixty at the surface, and on the Kentucky side of the river. The soil is a stiff clay, reposing on a bed of limestone rock, which does not rise more than three feet and a half above the level of the proposed canal ; which, according to the estimate of the engineer, Mr Baldwin, will cost 240,000 dollars.

Banks. The only one is the bank of Kentucky, established at Frankfort, with a capital of 2,077,750 dollars; with branches at Washington, Paris, Lexington, Dansville, Russelville, Beardstown, and Louisville. In 1816 the debts due to this bank were 4,087,740 dollars; deposits in cash, 1,364,326; notes in circulation, 1,877,557 ; cash in hand, 1,233,148. The notes of this bank are in high credit. Those of Ohio and the neighbouring states have also a free and extensive circulation.

Bridges. A chain bridge crosses the Kentucky river at Frankfort.

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estimated at 6,181,024 dollars, besides the doubtful articles, valued at 1,033,180, and consisting of maplesugar, saltpetre, &c. At Maysville there is a glass factory; at Paris, several cording machines ; at Danville, several mills, factories, and rope-walks ; at Frankfort, hemp manufactories, powder-mills, a grist and saw-mill; at Cynthiana, ten grist and saw. mills; at Newport, an arsenal; at Louisville, several manufactories ; at Shipping Port, a rope-walk, 1250 feet in length ; at Vaugeville, a salt manufac. • tory, at which a bushel of salt is obtained from 300 gallons of water. Several large brigs have been built at Frankfort, and sent to New Orleans, and 500 hogsheads of tobacco have been shipped for the latter place in one year from the town of Henderson, on the Ohio river. In the month of September 1817, an association was formed at Lexington, for the encouragement of domestic manufactures. - Commerce. The foreign commerce of this state is yet inconsiderable, owing to its great distance from the sea, and the consumption of its staple productions by new settlers. The exports consist chiefly of wheat, rye, barley, hemp, tobacco, live cattle, whisky, and peach brandy. The introduction of steam-boats has removed one of the great objections to this country as a place of residence. Other evils which existed about the year 1793, the uncertainty of land titles, the labours and dangers of the militia service, from Indian hostility, * have also ceased ; and the mildness

* Some information respecting America, collected by Thomas Cooper, late of Manchester. London, 1 vol. in Svo, 1794, p. 24.

of the climate, with the great fertility of the soil, now overbalance all objections. Steam-boats, of 360 tons, ascend from New Orleans to Louisville, a distance of 2500 miles, in 25 days, and descend in eight. or nine, with passengers, and freight, amounting to about 200 tons. Louisville, situated in latitude 38° 8' north, is now a port of entry.

Canals.—A company have been incorporated, for the purpose of running a canal along the rapids of Louisville, with a capital of 500,000 dollars. The descent in nine miles is twenty-two feet. The canal is to be two miles in length, sixteen in depth, twenty in width below, sixty at the surface, and on the Kentucky side of the river. The soil is a stiff clay, reposing on a bed of limestone rock, which does not rise more than three feet and a half above the level of the proposed canal ; which, according to the estimate of the engineer, Mr Baldwin, will cost 240,000 dollars.

Banks.—The only one is the bank of Kentucky, established at Frankfort, with a capital of 2,077,750 dollars; with branches at Washington, Paris, Lexington, Dansville, Russelville, Beardstown, and Louisville. In 1816 the debts due to this bank were 4,087,740 dollars; deposits in cash, 1,364,326; notes in circulation, 1,877,557 ; cash in hand, 1,233,118. The notes of this bank are in high credit. Those of Ohio and the neighbouring states have also a free and extensive circulation.

Bridges.-A chain bridge crosses the Kentucky . river at Frankfort.

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