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sy air, upborne by the shouts and huzzas of a giddy multitude, all of them are now silent and forgotten ; all that remains of them is consigned to oblivion in the musty records of Parliament, or lives only in the shadow of a name. I wished there. fore to bring them on the stage once more, and drag them out of that obscurity, from which it is now impossible to redeem their fellowactors. I was uneasy till I had made the monumental pile of octavos and folios, “ wherein I saw them quietly inurned, open its ponderous and marble jaws," and " set the imprisoned wranglers free again." It is possible that some of that numerous .raçe. of pratars, yhä bave sprung up within the last ten years; to whom I should certainly have first paid my compliments, may not be satisfied vith the space allotted them in these volumes.. But I cannot help it. My object was to revive what was forgotten; anid.eisbodyowhat was permanent ; and not to echo the loquacious babblings of these accomplished persons, who, if all their words were written in a book, the world would not contain them. Besides, living speakers may, and are in the habit of printing their own speeches. Or even if this were not the case, there is no danger, while they have breath and lungs left, that they will ever suffer the public to be at a loss for daily specimens of their polished eloquence and profound wisdom.

There were some other objects to be attended to in making this collection, as well as the style of different speakers. I wished to make it a history, as far as I could, of the progress of the language, of the state of parties at different periods, of the most interesting debates, and in short, an abridged parliamentary history for the time. It was necessary that it should serve as a common-place book of the principal topics, of the pros and cons of the different questions, that may be brought in. to dispute. If, however, this work has the effect which I intend it to have, it will rather serve to put a stop to that vice of much

speaking, which is the fashion of the present day, by shewing our forward disputants how little new is to be said on any of these questions, than offer a temptation to their vanity to enrich themselves out of the spoils of others. I have also endeavoured to gratify the reader's curiosity, by sometimes giving the speeches of men who were not celebrated for their eloquence, but for other things ; as Cromwell, for example. If, therefore, any one expects to find nothing but eloquent speeches in these volumes, he will certainly be disappointed. A very small volume indeed, would contain all the recorded eloquence of both houses of parliament.

As to the notes and criticisms, which accompany the speeches, I am aware that they are too long and frequent for a work of this nature. If, hoever, the reader should not be of opinion that “ the things themselves are Ticießer new nor rare," he is at liberty to apply the next line of the satire to them,-he may naturally enough wonder, “ how the devil they got there." The characters of Chatham, Burke, Fox, and Pitt, are those which are the most laboured. As to the first of these, I am not 50 certain. It was written in the heat of the first impression which his speeches made upon me : and perhaps the first impression is a fair test of the effect they must produce on those who heard them. But farther I will not be answerable for it. As to the opinions I have expressed of the three last speakers, they are at least my settled opinions, and I believe I shall not easily change them. In the selections from Burke, I have followed the advice of friends in giving a whole speech, whereas I ought to have given only extracts.

For the bias which may sometimes appear in this work, I shall only apologize by referring the impartial reader to the different characters of Fox and Burke. These will, I think, shew, that whatever my prejudices may be, I am not much disposed to be blinded by them.

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Mr. Fot, on the Slave Trade

7

410

on the Test Act

418
on Treasonable Designs

434
on the War with France

474
on the Habeas Corpus

491
on an Inquiry into the Conduct of Ministers

511
on Mr. Pite’s Bill for preventing Sedition

517
on the Address to his Majesty

528
in answer to Mr. Dundas

542

Sir W. Meredith's Speech on the Lord Mayor (Wilkes) being

committed to the Tower

86

on the frequency of Executions 163
Mr. Sawbridge': Motion for shortening the Duration of Parlia-
ments

89

General Burgoyne, on American Affairs

95

Mr. Jenkinson (Since Earl of - Liverpool) on Articles of Sub-

scription

102

Hon. Temple Luttrell, on the American War

112

Mr. Wilkes, on the Middlesex Question

119

on equal Representation

141
on the State of the British Museum

158

Marquis of Granby, on the Contest with America

135

Earl of Effingham, on the same

138

Mr. Dunning, (Lord Ashburton) on punishing Persons suspect-

ed of Piracy

154

on the Powers of the Admiralty Board - 188
on the Right of Petition

- 316

Thomas Lord Lyttleton, on the War with America

174

The Duke of Manchester, on the same

- 179

Sir Charles Bunbury, on the State of Parties

191

Mr. Pitt, on economical reform

304

on the American War

318

on a Reform of Parliament

. 328

on the State of Ireland

364

on the Regency

393

on the Slave Trade

408

on the Army Establishment

413

on the Test Act

· 420

on the Time for Reform

429

on the Dismission of M. Chauvelin

444

on the Existence of a Conspiracy

498

on the Imperial Loan

· 504

on bringing in his Bill to prevent Seditious Meetings 514

on the Success of the War

533

Mr. Sheridan, on a Military Force -

- 309
on the Situation of Ireland

. 357
on the Trial of Warren Hastings

379
in reply to Lord Mornington

451

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Mr. Sheridan, on the Suspension of the Habeas Corpus Act 501
on Mr. Addington's Administration

581

Mr. Adam, on political Conversion

313

Mr. T. Townshend, in reply

315

Sir James Lowther, against continuing the American War - 320

Mr. Powys, on the same Subject

322

- on a Reform of Parliament

335

Sir George Saville, on the American War

324
Mr. Grattan, on the Declaration of Rights

326
in reply to Mr. Flood.

356

Mr. T. Pitt, on Parliamentary Reform

337

Mr. Beaufoy, on the same

340

on the Test Act

372

Duke of Richmond, on putting the Seals into Commission 342

Duke of Portland, on the same

349

Lord Stormont, on the same

350

| Lord Loughborough, on the same

351

Mr. Flood's Invective against Mr. Grattan

• 354

Motion for a more equal Representation . 425

Mr. Curran, on the Liberty of Ireland

369
Mr. Wilberforce, on the Slave Trade

400
Mr. Henniker, on the same subject

411

Mr. Wyndham, in reply to Mr. Flood

428

on the Existence of a Conspiracy

442

on the Treaty of Amiens

575
Lord Mornington, on the War with France

448

Mr. Sergeant Adair, on the Introduction of Foreign Troops into

the Kingdom -

482

Mr. Dundas, on employing the Emigrants

484
Mr. Grey, on the Treason Bill

486
on moving for Peace

507

Mr. Canning, on the Treason Bill

488

Mr. Courtenay, in reply

489

Mr. Erskine, on the Suspension of the Habeas Corpus Act 521

Lord Thurlow, on the same

- 526

Duke of Bedford, on the Address

• 536

Lord Grenville, in reply

539

Marquis of Lansdowne, on the same,

• 540

Earl of Fife, on an Inquiry into the State of the Nation 561

Mr Horne Tooke, on the Eligibility of Clergymen to sit in Par-
liament

562

20

64

• 206
- 466
494

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