The Constitution of the United States of America: With an Alphabetical Analysis, the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, the Prominent Political Acts of George Washington, Electoral Votes for All the Presidents and Vice-presidents, the High Authorities and Civil Officers of Government, from March 4, 1789, to March 3, 1847, Chronological Narrative of the Several States, and Other Interesting Matter, with a Description Account of the State Papers, Public Documents, and Other Sources of Political and Statistical Information at the Seat of Government

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T.K. & P.G. Collins, 1854 - Constitutional history - 521 pages
 

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Page 231 - The basis of our political systems is the right of the people to make and to alter their Constitutions of Government. But the Constitution which at any time exists, till changed by an explicit and authentic act of the whole people, is sacredly obligatory upon all.
Page 498 - For the more convenient management of the general interest of the United States, delegates shall be annually appointed in such manner as the legislature of each state shall direct...
Page 503 - And whereas it hath pleased the Great Governor of the World to incline the hearts of the legislatures we respectively represent in Congress to approve of, and to authorize us to ratify, the said articles of confederation and perpetual union: KNOW YE, That we, the undersigned delegates, by virtue of the power and authority to us given for that purpose, do by these presents.
Page 442 - The navigable waters leading into the Mississippi and St. Lawrence, and the carrying places between the same, shall be common highways, and forever free, as well to the inhabitants of the said territory as to the citizens of the United States, and those of any other states that may be admitted into the Confederacy, without any tax, impost, or duty therefor.
Page 239 - I dare not hope they will make the strong and lasting impression I could wish that they will control the usual current of the passions or prevent our nation from running the course which has hitherto marked the destiny of nations. But if I may even flatter myself that they may be productive of some partial benefit, some occasional good that they may now and then recur to moderate the fury of party spirit, to warn against the mischiefs of foreign intrigue, to guard against the impostures of pretended...
Page 238 - The great rule of conduct for us, in regard to foreign nations, is, in extending our commercial relations, to have with them as little political connexion as possible. So far as we have already formed engagements let them be fulfilled with perfect good faith. Here let us stop.
Page 503 - And the Articles of this confederation shall be inviolably observed by every state, and the union shall be perpetual ; nor shall any alteration at any time hereafter be made in any of them ; unless such alteration be agreed to in a congress of the united states, and be afterwards confirmed by the legislatures of every state.
Page 306 - ... in the service of any foreign prince or State, or of any colony, district, or people...
Page 300 - The records and judicial proceedings of the courts of any State or Territory, or of any such country, shall be proved or admitted in any other court within the United States, by the attestation of the clerk, and the seal of the court annexed, if there be a seal, together with a certificate of the judge, chief justice, or presiding magistrate, that the said attestation is in due form.
Page 288 - The wisdom of our sages and blood of our heroes have been devoted to their attainment; they should be the creed of our political faith: the text of civic instruction; the touchstone by which to try the services of those we trust; and should we wander from them in moments of error or of alarm, let us hasten to retrace our steps and to regain the road which alone leads to peace, liberty, and safety.

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