Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, Volume 11

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Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, 1860 - Natural history
"Publications of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia": v. 53, 1901, p. 788-794.

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Page 247 - He was biting the fish, just on the forward side of the dorsal fin, with a deadly gripe, and the poor fish was swimming round and round slowly, or twisting its body as if in pain. The head of its black enemy was sometimes almost pulled under water, but never entirely, for the fish did not seem to have enough strength, but moved its fins as if exhausted, and often rested. At last it swam under a floating leaf at the shore, and appeared to be trying, by going under that, to scrape off the spider,...
Page 8 - Geological Report of the Country along the Line of the South-western Branch of the Pacific Railroad. State of Missouri.
Page 171 - ... their beds, and become mingled with the remains of recent indigenous and domestic animals, and objects of human art; so that when a collection is made in this locality, it is sometimes difficult to determine whether the animal remains belong to the formations mentioned or not. Generally, however, we have been able to ascertain where the fossils belong, which we have had the opportunity of examining, from the fact that the greater number were obtained from the deposits referred to in digging into...
Page 172 - The specimens present so much difference in condition of preservation, or change in structure ; so much variation in size, from that of the more ordinary horse to the largest English dray horse ; and such variableness in constitution, from that of the recent horse to the most complex condition belonging to any extinct species described, — that it would be about as easy to indicate a half dozen species as it would two. " Under the circumstances, I would characterize the extinct horse of the United...
Page 6 - Red sandstone, with some layers of hard, light gray calcareous, do., and both containing ferruginous concretions. Locality, bluffs Smoky Hill river, five or six miles above Grand Saline river. Probably local, thickness seen about 15 5.
Page 172 - ... ordinary horse to the largest English dray horse; and such variableness in constitution, from that of the recent horse to the most complex condition belonging to any extinct species described, — that it would be about as easy to indicate a half dozen species as it would two. " Under the circumstances, I would characterize the extinct horse of the United States as having had about the same size as the recent one, ranging from the more ordinary varieties to the English dray horse, with molar...
Page 10 - ... grounds, especially as they are not, so far as our knowledge extends, separated by any discordance of stratification, or other physical break.* Indeed the fact that some of the Permian types occurring in No. 10, were first introduced in beds below this, containing many Carboniferous species, would seem to indicate that even No. 10 may possibly have been deposited just before the close of a period of transition from the conditions of the Carboniferous, to those of the Permian epoch.
Page 170 - The collections of these gentlemen consist of a most remarkable intermixture of remains of fishes, reptiles and mammals, of the three periods mentioned ; and in many cases perhaps we may err in referring a particular species to a certain formation, more especially in the case of the fishes. The remains usually consist of teeth often well preserved, but frequently in small fragments, more or less water worn ; and most of the fossils are stained brown or black.
Page 6 - Hill river, five or six miles above Grand Saline river. Probably local, thickness seen about- •••-.- 15 5. Bluish, red, light-yellow, and gray clays, and soft claystones, with sometimes a few thin layers of magnesian limestone. In many places these clays have been traversed in every direction by cracks, into which calcareous and argillaceous matter have found their way, and subsequently become consolidated so as to form thin seams of impure yellowish limestone, which cross and intersect each...

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