Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Books Books 1 - 10 of 58 on The Scots have something to plead for their easy reception of an improbable fiction....
" The Scots have something to plead for their easy reception of an improbable fiction : they are seduced by their fondness for their supposed ancestors. A Scotchman must be a very sturdy SECOND SIGHT 177 moralist, who does not love Scotland better than... "
Notes on The Authenticity of Ossian's Poems - Page 43
1868
Full view - About this book

A Dissertation on the Authenticity of the Poems of Ossian

Sir John Sinclair - 1806 - 232 pages
...boys, and it never was said that any of " them could recite six lines." lie farther observes, " that the Scots have something to plead " for their easy reception of an improbable fiction ; they are se" duced by the fondness for their supposed ancestors. A Scotch" man must be a very sturdy moralist...
Full view - About this book

The poems of Ossian, in the orig. Gaelic, with a tr. into Lat. by R ...

Ossian, sir John Sinclair (1st bart.) - 1807
...boys, and it never was said that any of " them could recite six lines." lie farther observes, " that the Scots have something to plead " for their easy reception of an improbable fiction ; they are se" duccd by the fondness for their supposed ancestors. A Scotch" man must be a very sturdy moralist...
Full view - About this book

The poems of Ossian in the original Gaelic, Volume 1

James Macpherson - Bards and bardism - 1807
...boys, and it never was said that any of " them could recite six lines/' lie farther observes, " that the Scots have something to plead " for their easy reception of an improbable fiction ; they are se" duced by the fondness for their supposed ancestors. A Scotch" man must be a very sturdy moralist...
Full view - About this book

The poems of Ossian in the original Gaelic, Volume 1

James Macpherson - Bards and bardism - 1807
...boys, and it never was said that any of " them could recite six lines." He farther observes, " that the Scots have something to plead " for their easy reception of an improbable fiction; they are se" duced by the fondness for their supposed ancestors. A Scotch" man must be a very sturdy moralist...
Full view - About this book

The Ruminator: Containing a Series of Moral, Critical, and ..., Volume 2

Sir Egerton Brydges, Robert Pearse Gillies - 1813
...its title to both these characters. Upon the former of these topics Dr. Johnson harshly lObserved, " a Scotchman must be a very sturdy moralist, who does not love Scotland better than truth." It was the bitter remark of a bigotted and ungrateful visitor, whose toryism. (if not his better feelings)...
Full view - About this book

The General biographical dictionary, Volume 21

Alexander Chalmers - Biography & Autobiography - 1815
...which no personal injury is the consequence, and which flatters the author with his own ingenuity. The Scots have something to plead for their easy reception...for their supposed ancestors. A Scotchman must be a sturdy moralist who does not love Scotland better than truth ; he will always love it better than inquiry,...
Full view - About this book

The general biographical dictionary. Revised by A. Chalmers

New and general biographical dictionary - 1815
...which no personal injury is the consequence, and which flatters the author with his own ingenuity. The Scots have something to plead for their easy reception...for their supposed ancestors. A Scotchman must be a sturdy moralist who does not love Scotland better than truth; he will always love it better than inquiry,...
Full view - About this book

The General Biographical Dictionary: Containing an Historical and ..., Volume 21

Alexander Chalmers - Biography - 1815
...which no personal injury is the consequence, and which flatters the author with his own ingenuity. The Scots have something to plead for their easy reception of an improhable fiction : they are seduced by their fondness for their supposed ancestors. A Scotchman must...
Full view - About this book

The Works of Samuel Johnson, Ll. D.: Containing essays, tracts, and Journey

Samuel Johnson, Arthur Murphy - English literature - 1820
...personal injury k TOL. vni. 2 A the consequence, and which flatters the author with his own ingenuity. The Scots have something to plead for their easy reception...by their fondness for their supposed ancestors. A Scotsman must be a very sturdy moralist, who does not love Scotland better than truth ; he will always...
Full view - About this book

Lives of Scottish Poets, Volume 2

Society of Ancient Scots - Poets, Scottish - 1822 - 378 pages
...ingenuity. The TAUT 3.] P Scots have something to plead for their easy reception of an improhable fietion: they are seduced by their fondness for their supposed ancestors. A Scotchman must be a sturdy moralist, who does not love Scotland better than truth : he will always love it better than...
Full view - About this book




  1. My library
  2. Help
  3. Advanced Book Search
  4. Download PDF