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2. He cannot legally grant a second special certificate to the same person.

3. His expenses for printing, postage, rent of rooms, stationery, books, etc., shall not exceed $200 per year.

4. No traveling fees are allowed him while engaged in his official duties.

THE EXAMINERS.

HOW AP-
POINTED.

ELIGIBILITY.

COMPENSA-
TION.

The examiners are appointed at the October meeting of

the board of supervisors for a term of two years, a majority of those present and voting being

necessary to a choice (2476). It is so arranged that one examiner goes out of office each year. A person eligible to this office must be the holder of at

least a third grade certificate and have had an

experience of nine months as teacher (4817). Examiners receive four dollars per day for time actually

employed in their official duties, and persons appointed to assist the commissioner in school

visitation receive three dollars per day. The whole expense incurred for assistant visitors in any one year is limited to ninety dollars (4815). When a vacancy occurs in the office of examiner, the com

missioner and remaining examiner, together with the judge of probate, act as a board to appoint a

successor, who shall hold his office for the balance of the unexpired term (4819). The examiners assist the commissioner in the work of con

ducting examinations and issuing certificates. ASSIST AT EX. The duties of the board as to the granting of

teachers' certificates will be discussed in another chapter.

Township Board of School Inspectors. The state constitution (Art. 11, Sec. 1) provides for the election of a township clerk who shall be ex officio school in

VACANCY IN
OFFICE,

AMINATIONS.

spector, and for the election of one school inspector; the statute (684u) in addition to this declares that the term of office shall be two years. The board of school inspectors, therefore, consists of the township clerk and two inspectors. Women are eligible to hold the office (2382). The organization of the board must be effected within

twenty days after the first Monday in April. The township clerk is the clerk of the board, and the

board shall elect one of their number chairman. The chairman is also the treasurer of the board (4693) and as such is the proper custodian of the township library money (30 Mich. 100). The treasurer is required to give a bond for the safe keep

ing of the monyes that may come into his hands.

ORGANI-
ZATION

TREASURER'S
BOND.

POWERS AND DUTIES. *

SUPERVISORY CHARGE.

MAKE
REPORTS.

The chairman of the board of inspectors is required (4808 to 4819): First, To have general supervisory charge of the schools

of his township, subject to such advice and direc

tion as the county commissioner may give. Second, To make such reports of his official labors and of

the condition of the schools as he superintend

ent of public instruction may direct or commissioner request.

The law relative to the powers and duties of school inspectors has undergone many changes and, in the older portions of the state, there seems to be little left for them to do.

*NOTE.—City and township school districts which have been incorporated as such by special enactment, have various provisions defining the powers and duties, election and term of office of school inspector. In some of these, as in Act No. 176. Laws of 1891, the duties of the inspectors are performed by another set of officers.

TANT DUTY.

The most important of these duties and one which gener

ally falls to the clerk, is the preparation, on the MOST IMPOR- third Monday in September, of the triplicate an

nual report of the schools of the township to the superintendent of public instruction. Blanks for this purpose are prepared at the department of public instruction. One of these reports is filed with the township clerk, another with the county clerk, and the third is sent to the department office at Lansing. Before making these reports it is the duty of the board to

ascertain if the schools have been taught by legally qualified teachers. The report must

contain a full financial account of all moneys received and disbursed (4696). The number of meetings of the inspector at the expense of

the township shall not exceed eight in any one

year (4697). The authority of the inspectors to form new districts (4646) is discussed in another part of this book.

Township Clerk. The township clerk is an important official in the management of educational matters in his township.

FINANCIAL
ACCOUNT

NUMBER OF
MEETINGS.

POWERS AND DUTIES.

OF SCHOOL IN-
SPECTORS.

We mention briefly some of his chief duties as follows:

1. To act as clerk of the board of school inspectors, attend CLERK BOARD all meetings, and keep a record of their pro

ceedings. 2. To receive all reports to inspectors from school direct

ors, and file such reports in his office. 3. To receive all such communications, blanks, and docu

ments as may be transmitted by the superintenRECEIVE COM. dent of public instruction, and dispose of them

as directed by said superintendent (4698).

RECEIVE
REPORTS.

MUNICATIONS.

TRANSMIT
CHAIRMAN'S
ADDRESS

4. To transmit to the county clerk, immediately after the

organization of the board of inspectors, the name and postoffice address of the chairman of

said board. 5. To cause a map to be prepared showing the boundaries PREPARE MAP. of the school districts of the township (4700).

6. To make and deliver to the supervisor a certified copy of all statements on file in his office of money to be raised by taxation in the several school districts of his township. 7. To attend to the apportionment of the school moneys of

the districts entitled to the same, according to the number of pupils in each between the ages

of five and twenty years. 8. To act as clerk of township board at meetings called to

remove school officers (4772).

DIRECT
APPORTION-
MENTS.

CLERK OF
TOWNSHIP
BOARD.

TOWNSHIP
BOARD OF
EDUCATION.

9. To act in township school districts of the Upper Pen

insula, as member and ex officio clerk of the board of education. His duties in such town

ships are quite similar to his duties in other townships of the state, and his salary as clerk of the board of education is limited to fifty dollars per year (4823).

CHAPTER III.

ORGANIZATION OF SCHOOL DISTRICTS.

Primary Schools.

FORM
AND SIZE.

The original and fundamental school organization in Michigan is the district, which is established by authority of the township board of school inspectors. After a township has been organized, its territory shall be divided into school districts which shall not exceed nine sections of land in size and which may be altered from time to time in the discretion of the inspectors. The statute directs that the territory of each district must

be in as compact form as may be (4646). It is not essential that the territory of the maximum

school district shall contain exactly nine full sections of land, but it must not contain more than 5,760 acres (75 Mich. 143). After an organization has been effected by the inspectors,

it is the duty of the clerk to deliver to a taxable inhabitant of the district a notice in writing of

the formation of such district, describing its boundaries and specifying the time and place of the first meeting, which notice, with the fact of such delivery, is entered upon record by the clerk. The notice also directs such inhabitant to notify every qualified voter of such district, either personally or by leaving a written notice at his place of residence, of the time and place of said meeting, at least five days before the time appointed therefor; and it is the duty of such inhabitant to notify the qualified voters of said district accordingly; and said inhabitant, when he has notified the qualified voters, indorses thereon a return, showing such notification with the date or dates thereof, and delivers such notice and return to the chairman of the

NOTICE OF
FIRST MEET-
ING

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