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The Appendix is meant to supply to business men and travellers, as well as to Seamen, those reliable statistics respecting the government, resources, commerce, growth, and prosperity of the Hawaiian Islands, which all visitors, or any persons who are seeking accurate information respecting a country, desire to have at hand. In lieu of something more perfect, it is hoped that this may answer as a guide-book and vade-mecum to tourists in the Pacific.

In connection with the tinted engravings, the author and publishers regret certain typographical errors, which were not observed till the edition was in part printed. The candid reader is therefore requested to read on the vignette title-page, Kaahumanu, for Kaahamann, and Hawaiian, for Hawanan.

New York, August 20lh, 1851.

CONTENTS.

CHAPTER I.

LOCAL TRADITIONS OF CAPTAIN COOK, AND GLIMPSES OF OLD PAGANISM IN

THE HEART OF THE PACIFIC.

A notable wonder—Curious Fancies of the Natives respecting the first

Ship—They venture nigh in Canoes—They recognize their god Lono—

They pay Divine Worship to Captain Cook—They grow familiar with the

Haoles—They smart under Indignities and Exactions—The bent bow

snaps—They are undeceived—The Denouement—He groans—He is not

a god—The Fighl^-The Fall—The Eetreat—The burning of the Naviga-

tor's Body—The Exploits of Phillips—The Narrative of Ledyard—The

Eevenge—The Providence—We stand where Cook fell—We visit the

Spot where his Body was burned—Monumental Inscription—Natural

reflection upon his end—Forms of the Old Idolatry—Pagan Notions re-

specting the Soul—The Eealms of Wakea and Milu-rProvidence and

Grace in the Heart of the Pacific Page 19

CHAPTER H.

KEALAKEKUA BAY NOW AND THIRTY YEARS AGO.

The Trail from Kailua—Observed Wealth of Nature—Insight of the Spir-

itual through the Veil of the Natural—Analogy drawn and Lessons de-

rived—We view the Ocean from on high—Coffee Plantation of a Man

from Maine—A Relic from the Times of Kamehameha the Great—The

Premises of a Missionary heave in sight—Primitive Hospitality—City of

Refuge at Honaunau—The Iona of Hawaii—Ellis's Account of it quarter

of a Century ago—The hideous Corpse of Paganism—The Deeds of

Despots—Legendary Exploit of an Hawaiian Gracchus—Solo Feature of

Humanity in the System of Paganism—Human Sacrifices—Numbers

once Immolated—Last at Kealakekua—Comparison of Christianity with

Paganism—Incredible Change—The Theme of Song—The transforming

Agent—Investment of a Massachusetts Wheelwright—How to make
eighteen hundred per cent, by a Donation to Missions—Death and Life

springing from the same Bay of Kealakekua—Sketches of Obookiah—

Providential Voyage to America, and Adoption at Cornwall — Other

Links in the Chain of Providence — Adventures of Thomas Hopu —

Hopes from the Cornwall School—Natural Disappointment—The Heart

of the Pacific in 1820 and 1850—Blessedness of the Change Page Zi

CHAPTER III.

LAHAINA AND ITS ENVIRONS ON THE ISLAND OF MAUI.

Good-bye to Hawaii—Grateful Reminiscences—The Continental Character

of Missionaries—Portraiture of a good Priest—Run to Maui by Whale-

ship—Facilities for Recruiting at Lahaina—Seamen's Chaplain—Gratu-

itous Services of Missionaries—Sailors always careless when not cared

for—Winding up of a Liberty-day at Lahaina, in the season of Ships—

An honorable Pre-eminence—Hawaiians a Surf-playing—Sea-bathing a

national Passion—A young Forest of Coeoanuts—Improvements under

the old System of Tyranny an Invitation to Robbery and Extortion-

Revolution in Progress—Its benign Effects—Love's Labor never Lost

—Solace to the Philanthropist in the event of the Nation's Decease— -

Lahaina at the poetic Distance and close at Hand—Native Stone Meet-* -

ing-house—Power of the Gospel there—Liberality and Means of the

Church — Array of Arguments for the People supporting their own

Ministers—Peculiar Advantages at Lahaina—The Hawaiian Democracy

—Remarkable running out of the Race of Rulers—Precious Dust in

God's-Acre — Character and Influence of the High Chief Hoapili — A

striking Anecdote—Vistas of Prophecy opened—Tendency of Things

—Cheering Progress 59

CHAPTER IV.

THE FOOTSTEPS OF BEAUTY TRACED BY A TRAVELLER IN NATURE, LANGUAGE,

AND RELIGION.

A Canoe takes us to Wailuku—Elements of the Beautiful at Home and

Abroad—Morning on the Mountain—Effect of natural Scenery upon

Childhood—Curious Hawaiian Etymologies—A Catalogue of queer Ap-

pellatives—The peculiar Genius and Idioms of the Hawaiian Tongue—

Words to be domesticated into English—Conversational Uses of the

Native—Commendable Solicitude of Hawaiians for the Purity of their

Language—Classical Discussion at an Assembly of Teachers—Fear of

barbarous Innovations from Abroad—A Book of Fables suggested—

Their Uses illustrated—Isaac Taylor on the Employment of the Esopian

Vehicle of Instruction—Notices of the Wailuku Church and Pastor—

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