Elements of Algebra: Embracing ... the Theory and Application of Logarithms ... with an Appendix Containing Infinite Series ...

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Harper & Bros., 1844 - 346 pages
 

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Page 163 - Bring down the first figure of the next period to the remainder for a new dividend, to which find a new divisor as before, and in like manner proceed till the whole be finished.
Page 164 - Subtract this square number from the first period, and to the remainder bring down the next period for a dividend.
Page 38 - Divide the first term of the dividend by the first term of the divisor, and write the result as the first term of the quotient. Multiply the whole divisor by the first term of the quotient, and subtract the product from the dividend.
Page 64 - Multiply the numerators together for a new numerator, and the denominators together for a new denominator.
Page 57 - To reduce fractions of different denominators to equivalent fractions, having a common denominator. RULE. — Multiply each numerator into all the denominators except its own for the new numerators ; and multiply all the denominators together for a common denominator.
Page 151 - Multiply the divisor, thus augmented, by the last figure of the root, and subtract the product from the dividend, and to the remainder bring down the next period for a new dividend. V. Double the whole root already found, for a new divisor, and continue the operation as before, until all the periods are brought down.
Page 227 - If the numerator and denominator of each fraction is multiplied (or divided) by the same number, the value of the fraction will not change.
Page 226 - BY RATIO is meant the relation which one quantity bears to another, with respect to magnitude. It is evident that this relation can exist only between quantities of a similar kind ; thus, a number must be compared with a number; a line with a line; &c. &c. ; and it would be absurd to compare a certain number of feet with a certain number of pomds; &c.
Page 68 - The part of the equation which is on the left of the sign of equality is called the first member ; the part on the right of the sign of equality, the second member.
Page 16 - To raise a whole number or a decimal to any power, use it as a factor as many times as there are units in the exponent.

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