The Life of William Dummer Powell: First Judge at Detroit and Fifth Chief Justice of Upper Canada

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Michigan Historical commission, 1924 - Electronic books - 305 pages

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Page 156 - Nor can we suppress our astonishment, that a British Parliament should ever consent to establish in that country a religion that has deluged your island in blood, and dispersed impiety, bigotry, persecution, murder and rebellion through every part of the world.
Page 266 - ... be set aside and a new trial granted on the ground that the former verdict was contrary to law and evidence and excessive. Robt. Baldwin Esq. for the defendant. Refused.
Page 259 - ... other South American adventurer, in an expedition to liberate the Spanish colonies. He was taken. By law his life was forfeited, but he was condemned by a sentence nearly equivalent to perpetual imprisonment in the unwholesome fortress of Omoa. His father, Chief Justice of Canada, on hearing the sad tidings hastened to England. Unfortunately, hostilities had commenced under circumstances calculated to exasperate the government and people of Spain. The Chief Justice was, however, determined to...
Page 55 - Sure enough, she was wedged in beyond the power of moving without assistance. I heard a great laugh among the gentlemen, who were divided from us by a blanket partition. I suppose they were " quazed " too ! Lake Ontario is two hundred miles over. We were four days crossing it. We were...
Page 161 - He has shown me the originals of his papers, which I think are genuine. He produced also a quantity of Congress paper, which he says he received in payment for some of the supplies, and which...
Page 54 - Small as the place was, we chose to stay all night, so while Mrs. Powell was giving orders for arranging the beds, my brother and I walked out to enjoy a very fine evening. The banks of the river were very high and woody, the moon shone bright through the trees, some Indians were on the river taking fish with harpoons, a mode of fishing I had never seen before. They make large fires in their canoes, which attract the fish to the surface of the water, when they can see by the fire to strike them....
Page 152 - ... were now reduced to great distress & the poor Prisoners in danger of being starved. "I talked hardly to them of their breach of Promise — but however we marched to the next Fort, which surrendered without firing a gun. The same Promises were made...
Page 55 - ... the most beautiful illumination you can possibly form an idea of. The children were all in Extacies, running about like so many Savages, and our Sailors were encamped near enough for us to hear them singing and laughing. We had heard, just before we left Montreal, of his Majesty's recovery, so, if you please, you may set down all this as rejoicing on that account, tho' I doubt whether it once occurred to our minds, yet we are very loyal people.
Page 58 - Edward and Mr. Brisbane to the other side of the River where the Indians were holding a Council. The Gentlemen all returned in the evening and seemed so much pleased with their entertainment, that when they proposed our going over with them the next day we very readily agreed to it. I thought it...
Page 259 - Justice was, however, determined to try the efficacy of a personal application to alleviate the sufferings of his son, by a change of prison, since he despaired of obtaining his release. Having procured passports, he proceeded to Spain, furnished with a letter of introduction to the Prince of the Peace from me, to whom he applied as recently arrived from thence, and not involved in the angry feelings or discussions which had led to the rupture between the two countries. The Prince received him at...

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