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PRESERVATION COPY ADDED ORIGINAL TO BE FETAINED

SEP 2 2 1992

TRACING OF BROWN'S MAP of a portion of the

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ESSEQUEBO & POTARO RIVERS

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SHEWING THE POSITION OF KAIETEUR FALL.

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Scale, 7 Miles to an inch.

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Kaieteur Fall 59°19W.

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Stanford's Geog.' Estab. London

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Rancroft Library

35773 Bancroft Library

A VISIT TO THE KAIETEUR FALLS.

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EARLY in April, 1872, a party of gentlemen,* including three officers of the garrison in Georgetown, the capital of British Guiana, and a civilian resident in that colony, determined to pay a visit to the Falls of the Kaieteur, discovered for the first time in April, 1871, by Mr. Brown, the Government Surveyor, and subsequently visited by Sir George Young, Mr. Brown, and Mr. King, in July, 1871. Owing to their interesting account of these Falls, scientifically described by Mr. Brown in a paper which was read before the Royal Geographical Society of London (vide Report, R.G.S., for July, 1871), a certain enthusiasm. arose throughout the colony on the subject, and a general ambition to organize fresh parties of explorers to witness this beautiful and unhackneyed reality of nature. It being impossible to improve on the description of the Falls already given to the public by Mr. Brown, we determined to supplement this by illustrations of them and of what might be interesting in the way of scenery along the banks of the great river Essequibo and its tributary the Potaro, by which our route lay. We therefore took with us a photographer,

* The party consisted of the Honourable H. S. Bascom, M.C.P., and Major Webber, with Lieutenants E. H. Banfather and H. F. Jackson, of the 2nd West India Regiment.

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with his apparatus, chemicals, &c., which added greatly to the difficulty and expense of the undertaking. The result, however, compensated well for these, and we obtained twenty-one good views.

Mr. Sproston, of Georgetown, having kindly placed one of his steamers at our disposal, and all our baggage (small as regarded the person, but sufficiently bulky in the way of provisions and “ matériel ") being on board, we got under way about 6.30 o'clock on the morning of the 11th of April, 1872, for our first stage on the journey. This was H.M. Penal Settlement, about seventy miles up the Essequibo, on its left bank, and near the point where the rivers Mazaruni and Cuyuni join and swell its already expansive waters, which, some twenty miles wide, debouch into the Atlantic by four channels formed by Leguan, Wakenaam, and Tiger Islands.

After thirteen hours' steaming we arrived at our destination, disembarked, and were, by the kind permission of His Excellency Governor Scott, received at the Government building called the Commissioners' House, where we were comfortably lodged. On the following morning we were disappointed by the non-appearance of our river men, called in Canada

voyageurs," who, to the number of twenty-two, had been engaged to row us up the river, act as carriers where necessary, make our camps water-tight, and themselves “rum-tight,”—the latter true one way, but not always so in the other sense!

These men were half-breeds, descendants of Dutch fathers, and Indian mothers of various tribes, stout

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