The Natural History of the Farm: A Guide to the Practical Study of the Sources of Our Living in Wild Nature

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Comstock Publishing Company, 1914 - Natural history - 348 pages

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Page 233 - Tis enough for us now that the leaves are green. We sit in the warm shade and feel right well How the sap creeps up and the blossoms swell, We may shut our eyes, but we cannot help knowing That skies are clear and grass is growing.
Page 52 - Thou crownest the year with Thy goodness ; And Thy paths drop fatness. They drop upon the pastures of the wilderness : And the little hills rejoice on every side. The pastures are clothed with flocks ; The valleys also are covered over with corn ; They shout for joy, they also sing.
Page 205 - For there is hope of a tree, if it be cut down, that it will sprout again, And that the tender branch thereof will not cease. Though the root thereof wax old in the earth, And the stock thereof die in the ground ; Yet through the scent of water it will bud, And bring forth boughs like a plant But man dieth, and wasteth away : Yea, man giveth up the ghost, and where is he?
Page 150 - Then the little Hiawatha Learned of every bird its language, Learned their names and all their secrets, How they built their nests in Summer, Where they hid themselves in Winter, Talked with them whene'er he met them, Called them " Hiawatha's Chickens." Of all beasts he learned the language, Learned their names and all their secrets, How the beavers built their lodges, Where the squirrels hid their acorns, How the reindeer ran so swiftly, Why the rabbit was so timid, Talked with them whene'er he...
Page 180 - My heart is awed within me when I think Of the great miracle that still goes on, In silence, round me, — the perpetual work Of thy creation, finished, yet renewed Forever.
Page 320 - The little cares that fretted me I lost them yesterday, Among the fields above the sea, Among the winds at play, Among the lowing of the herds, The rustling of the trees, Among the singing of the birds, The humming of the bees.
Page 137 - The hand that built the firmament hath heaved And smoothed these verdant swells, and sown their slopes With herbage, planted them with island groves, And hedged them round with forests.
Page 268 - Awake, ye drunkards, and weep; and howl, all ye drinkers of wine, because of the new wine; for it is cut off from your mouth.
Page 9 - ... look back a little and tell you what our fathers have told us, and what we have heard from the white people. " Brother, listen to what we say. There was a time when our forefathers owned this great land.
Page 96 - I'm truly sorry man's dominion. Has broken nature's social union, An' justifies that ill opinion, Which makes thee startle At me, thy poor earth-born companion, An...

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