An Introduction to Algebra: Being the First Part of a Course of Mathematics, Adapted to the Method of Instruction in the American Colleges

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H. Howe, 1832 - Algebra - 332 pages
 

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Page 217 - In an arithmetical progression, the sum of the extremes is equal to the sum of any other two terms equally distant from the extremes.
Page 33 - We have seen that multiplying by a whole number, is taking the multiplicand as many times as there are units in the multiplier.
Page 124 - ... the product of the two, plus the square of the second. In the third case, we have (a + b) (a — 6) = a2 — b2. (3) That is, the product of the sum and difference of two quantities is equal to the difference of their squares.
Page 156 - The equality of the two sides is not affected by this alteration, because we only change one quantity x for another •which is equal to it. By this means we obtain an equation which contains only one unknown quantity.
Page 150 - A gentleman bought a number of pieces of cloth for 675 dollars, which he sold again at 48 dollars by the piece, and gained by the bargain as much as one piece cost him. What was the number of pieces ? Ans. 15.
Page 188 - Conversely, if the product of two quantities is equal to the product of two other quantities, the first two may be made the extremes, and the other two the means of a proportion.
Page 20 - If the same quantity or equal quantities be subtracted from equal quantities, the remainders will be equal. 3. If equal quantities be multiplied into the same, or equal quantities, the products will be equal. 4. If equal quantities be divided by the same or equal quantities, the quotients will be equal. 5. If the same quantity be both added to and subtracted from another, the value of the latter will not be altered. 6. If a quantity be both multiplied and divided by another, the value of the former...
Page 233 - Divide the first term of the dividend by the first term of the divisor, and write the result as the first term of the quotient. Multiply the whole divisor by the first term of the quotient, and subtract the product from the dividend.
Page 83 - Four places are situated in the order of the letters A, B, C, D. The distance from A to D is 34 miles. The distance from A to B is to the distance from C to D as 2 to 3. And ^ of the distance from A to B, added to half the distance from C to D, is three times the distance from B to C. What are the respective distances'!
Page 72 - If four magnitudes are in proportion, the product of the two extremes is equal to the product of the two means.

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