The Story of Laulii: A Daughter of Samoa. Giving Her Life, Manners and Customs of the Islanders, Peculiarities of the Race, Games, Amusements, Incidents of Many Kinds, and Matters of Interest in Connection with the Samoan People. Also, a Sketch of the Life of Alexander A. Willis, (her Husband.) ...

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J. Winterburn & Company, printers, 1889 - Missions - 255 pages
 

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Page 235 - Sea, which means that it is suitable to the climate and the people, and it consists of a large village of about sixty neat thatched cottages, laid out in a square, at one side of which stands the large class-room. Each cottage is the home of a student with his wife and family, preference in the filling up of vacancies being given to married men, both as a means of educating the women and children, and also because the people, in applying for teachers, generally ask for one whose wife can teach their...
Page 246 - Raiatea volunteered to go there as pioneers. They were accordingly landed on the isle of Aitutaki, the very name of which might have suggested encouragement. There they were favorably received by Tamatoa, the chief, and his people. Nevertheless, as it was well known that these were all cannibals, and constantly at war with one another, it was not without deep anxiety that Mr. Williams left the teachers to begin the mission. When, however, in the following year, he returned to the group. in company...
Page 237 - At morning and afternoon services all the neighboring villagers assemble, and the intervening and later hours are filled up with Sunday-school for children and Bible-classes for adults. A simple service, with a good deal of singing, ends the day. The Holy Communion is celebrated on the first Sunday of each month. The institution rules are few and simple; but 244 Beginning of Mission Work.
Page 127 - It must be understood that the proper place for cheese in a well arranged dietary is a substitute for, and not as an appendage to, meat. There is,, however, one exception to this rule, and that is the correctness of taking a small piece of cheese at the end of even a meat meal, for, paradoxical as it may seem, digestive reasons. According to the old adage, cheese is a " crusty elf, digesting all things but itself...
Page 159 - The Samoans tattoo the whole of the body from the hips to the knees, covering the skin so completely with the pattern that it looks at a little distance exactly as if the man were wearing a tight pair of ornamental drawers.
Page 237 - It would be difficult to imagine a healthier, happier life, than that of these students. At the first glimmer of the lovely tropical dawn, the college bell rings to mark the hour for household prayer. (There is probably not a house in Samoa where the family do not assemble daily for morning and evening prayer.) Then all the students go out, either to work in the gardens, or to fish in the calm lagoon. At eight the bell rings again to warn them that it is time to bathe and breakfast, to be ready for...
Page 236 - ... raise yams, taro, and bananas in abundance, and have also planted several thousand bread-fruit trees, cocoa-palms, and other fruit-bearing trees ; so that this noble institution is almost, if not altogether, self-supporting. From its commencement to the present day, fully two thousand teachers and native ministers have been here trained, including a considerable number of men from far-distant Papuan Isles — from the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, the Tokelau, and Savage Isles — all speaking...
Page 162 - ... most miserable beings, the wounded parts swollen and inflamed and displaying as yet none of the elegant pattern which has been traced on them. The lads hobble around in all sorts of contorted attitudes, fanning away the flies with flappers made of white shapo, and doing all in their power to alleviate the pain. At last, however, comes the reward of all their sufferings, and when their wounds are healed their friends get up a grand dance and the lads, now admitted among the men, think themselves...
Page 219 - Samoa, our native pastors have the care of two thousand five hundred Church members, and of a population exceeding ten thousand; and farther still, •while the better qualified and ordained native agency has increased, our European staff of Missionaries has decreased from fourteen to seven ; and the time may not be far distant when little more European help may be needed for the group and its out-stations, beyond a well sustained institution at Malua. And thus, we think, that the problem has, there...
Page 248 - ... caused by the too evenly-balanced state of the different parties. There is a truce for the moment patched up, I think mistakenly, by the missionaries ; it will prove but a hollow one if all I hear is true. * Behind the coco-fringe, the land sweeps up into lovely wooded hills some four thousand feet high, not so abruptly picturesque, perhaps, as the general tone of the Society Islands, but marked with beautiful curves and long graceful sweeps of vivid green. Here and there, valleys permit one...

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