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CONTENTS OF VOL. XLVI

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ABE WE to Lose SOUTH AFRICA ? By Sir Sidney Shippard
SCHOOL CHILDREN AS WAGE-BARNERS. By Sir John Gorst
THE INTERNATIONAL COUNCIL OF WOMEN IN CONGRESS. By the Countess

of Aberdeen

THE OPEN SPACES OF THE FUTURE.' By Miss Octavia Hill

THE MEDIEVAL SUNDAY. By Father Thurston

THE NATIVE AUSTRALIAN FAMILY. By Miss Edith Simcox

DANTE's Ghosts By D. R. Fearon .

WHILE WAITING IN A FRIEND's Room. By Sir Algernon West

THE TEETH OF THE SCHOOLBOY By Edwin Collins

THE OUTLOOK AT OTTAWA. By J. G. Snead Cox

The English MASQUB. By Professor Edward Dowden

IS THERE REALLY A 'CRISIS' IN THE CHURCH ? By the Hon. Sir Charles Roe 112

LORD ELLENBOROUGH. By Sir Spencer Walpole

OLD-AGE PEXSIONS IN FRANCE By Arthur F. Wood

131

PARLIAMENTARY GOVERNMENT IN JAPAN. By H. N. G. Bushby

142

A SUPREME MOMENT (a Play in one Act). By Mrs. W. K. Clifford 153

The EXCESSIVB ARMIES OF Russia. By Sir Lintorn Simmons

173

The LIMITATIONS OF NAVAL FORCE. By Sir George Sydenham Clarke

180

A Woman's CRITICISM OF THE WOMEN'S CONGRESS. By Miss Frances H.

Low

WHAT CHURCH HAS

i CONTINUITY'S

Ву

Ür. St. George Mivart

THE RECENT Fuss about the Irish LANGUAGE. ·By Professor Mahaffy. 213

THE CONNECTION OF ENGLAND WITH NEWFOUNDLAND. By Sir William

Des Væus

223

LORD ELLENBOROUGH. (A Reply.) 'By Lord Colchester

DID BIRON WRITE "WERNER? By the Hon. Frederick Leveson Gower : 243

THE MARLBOROUGH GEMS. By Charles Newton-Robinson

WHY ARE OUR BRAINS DETERIORATING ? By Colonel H. Elsdale .

LIFE ON THE NILE SOUTH OF Fashoda. By Arthur D. Milne

‘THE HUMOURS OF TER-NA-Nor.' By Mrs. Orman Cooper

282

THE “DECAMERON' AND ITS Villas. By W. J. Stillman

289

MADAME NECKER. By the Hon. Marcia C. Maxwell

THE EVOLUTION OF THE PARLIAMENTARY OATH. By Michael MacDonagh 317

The Casus BELLI IN SOUTH AFRICA. By Edmund Robertson

334

VARE WE TO LOSE SOUTH AFRICA ? (A Rejoinder.) By Sir Sidney

Shippard

345

THE IMPERIAL FUNCTION OF TRADE. By Henry Birchenough

RIFLE-SHOOTING AS A NATIONAL SPORT. By W. A. Baillie-Grohman

THE FUTURE OF THE GREAT ARMIES. By Sidney Low

A VISIT TO THE CRAIG BROok Salmon HATCHERY. By Moreton Frewen 396

AN INDIAN PLAGUE STORY. By Cornelia Sorabji
THE FATHER OF LETTERS. By Herbert Paul
RowTON HOUSES. (Prom a Resident.) By W. A. Sommerville
A Woman's CRITICISM OF THE WOMEN'S CONGRESS. (A Reply.) By

Mrs. Gaffney

THE AMERICAN NEGRO AND HIS PLACE. By Miss Elizabeth L. Banks

THE SIERRA LEONE DISTURBANCES. By Harry L. Stephen

AN ALL-BRITISH RAILWAY TO China. By C. A. Moreing

CABLILE AS AN HISTORIAN. By George Macaulay Trevelyan

The PHILOSOPHY OP POETKY. By the Hon. Martin Morris

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The FUTURE OF THE CHRISTIAN RELIGION. By the Rev. Dr. Percival

AFTER THE VERDICT—SEPTEMBER 1899. By Algernon Charles Swinburne 521

THE SITUATION IN SOUTH AFRICA: A VOICE FROM CAPE COLONY. By

the Rev. C. Usher Wilson

522

LIBERALISM AND ITS CROSS-CURRENTS. By the Rev. Dr. J Guinness Rogers 527

THE GREAT UNPAID. By Sir Algernon West

541

The Fear of OVER-EDUCATION. By Alexander Sutherland

550

ELECTRICITY IN INDIA. By Major C. C. Townsend

556

L'HIRTEENTH-CENTURY PERSIAN LUSTRE POTTERY. By Henry Wallis 560

TOWN AND COUNTRY LABOURERS :

(1) By Mrs. Stephen Batson

570

(2) By the Hon. Percy Wyndham

583

THE HOSPITAL WHERE THE PLAGUE BROKE OUT. By Miss C. O'Conor-

Eccles

591

NORTH CLARE: LEAVES FROM A DIARY. By the Hon. Emily Lawless 603

A TIBETAN POET AND Mystic. By the Rev. Graham Sandberg

613

POWDER AND Paint. By Miss Ida Taylor .

633

THE CRY OF THE CONSUMPTIVES. By James Arthur Gibson

641

THE NEW REFORMATION. II. A CONSCIENCE CLAUSE FOR THE LAITY.

By Mrs. Humphry Ward

654

THE CHURCH CRISIS AND DISESTABLISHMENT. By the Rev. Dr. Cobb 673

LAMBETH AND • LIBERATION.' By George W. E. Russell

685

AFTER THE PRESENT WAR. By Edward Dicey

693

NATIVE UNREST IN SOUTH AFRICA. By E. M. Green

708

The BATTLE OF TRAFALGAR: AN UNPUBLISHED NARRATIVE.

Admiral Sir Erasmus Ommanney

717

THE FUTURE OF LORD ROSEBERY. By H. W. Massingham

729

The Van Dyck EXHIBITION AT ANTWERP. By Claude Phillips

734

The INTELLECTUAL FUTURE OF CATHOLICISM. By W. H. Mallock

753

HORTICULTURE AS A PROFESSION FOR THE EDUCATED. By Miss A. Goodrich

Freer

769

THE DALMENY EXPERIMENTS: MANURING WITH BRAINS. D.

Young 782

CRICKET IN 1899, By A. C. Wootton

792

LITERATURE BEFORE LETTERS. By Professor Max Müller:

798

A DEVIL-DANCB IN CEYLON. By Mrs. Corner-Ohlmüs

814

CHARITY VERSOS OUTDOOR RELIEF. By Canon Barnett

818

THE REMITTANCE Man. By the Rev. D. Wallace Duthie

. 827

THE PLAGUE IN OPORTO. By A. Shadwell .
The NEWSPAPERS. By Sir Wemyss Reid

848, 1020

SOUTH AFRICAN PROBLEMS AND LESSONS:

(1) By Sidney Low

865

(2) By Sir Sidney Shippard

881

ENGLISH AND DUTCH IN THE Past. By Mrs. John Richard Green

891

TERMS USED IN MODERN GUNNERY. By Major-General Maurice .

905

MR. STEPHEN PHILLIPS'S TRAGEDY OF PAOLO AND FRANCESCA. By Sidney

Colvin

915

RECENT SCIENCE_METEORITES AND Comets

. By Prince Kropotkin

CROMWELL AND THE ELECTORATE. By J. Horace Round

947

A NBGRO ON The Position of the NEGRO IN AMERICA. By D. E. Tobias 957

PLAGIARISM. By E. F. Benson

974

THE CHURCHMAN's Politics : A DIALOGUE. "By the Rev. Anthony C. Deane 982

The WAR-CLOUD IN THE FARTHEST East. By Holt S. Hallett .

988

A HINDU HOME. By the Hon. J. D. Rees .

996

AUSTRIA AT THE END OF THE Century. By Francis Count Lützow

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833

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THE

NINETEENTH

CENTURY

No. CCLXIX-JULY 1899

ARE WE TO LOSE SOUTH AFRICA ?

In view of the issues at stake in South Africa at the present time, the Editor of this Review has done me the honour of asking me to write an article on the Transvaal crisis. In doing so I have to break for once the rule of silence which is generally binding on ex-officials in respect of political questions of a controversial nature—at least, in cases in which their utterances might possibly tend to embarrass the Government they formerly served. I have hitherto refused all requests of the kind with reference to South African politics, even when sorely tempted to contradict erroneous statements or to expose the fallacies underlying the sentimental tirades which apparently find such ready acceptance among well-meaning but credulous people unacquainted with the conditions of life in South Africa. The present is, however, an exceptional occasion, and I feel at liberty to speak out plainly. The result of the Bloemfontein Conference has created a new situation, and my views, based upon long personal experience, are in accordance with the present policy of Her Majesty's Government, so far as I can judge from the recently published despatches between Mr. Chamberlain and Sir Alfred Milner.

I ought, perhaps, to begin by explaining why my opinion has been asked, and how I am qualified to form an impartial judgment with regard to the present crisis in South Africa. I have been connected with South Africa by the closest personal ties from an early age, and long before I visited the country I was familiar with its history, its politics, its races, and even the characters of its leading men. I first went out to practise at the bar of the Supreme Court in Capetown in 1870. Shortly after the territory of

VOL. XLVI-No. 269

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Griqualand West was annexed to the Empire as a Crown colony by Sir Henry Barkly's Proclamation of the 1st of October 1871, I proceeded to the diamond fields in order to practise at the bar of the High Court of Griqualand. I subsequently became Attorney-General there, and had many strange experiences during a somewhat stormy period. Later on-in 1880—I became one of the Judges of the Supreme Court of the Cape of Good Hope in the Eastern Districts, where frequent circuits familiarised me with the whole country and its inhabitants. I held that office for nearly six

I held that office for nearly six years, including the time when I was the British Commissioner on the Anglo-German Commission appointed after the German annexation of Great Namaqualand and Damaraland.

In 1885,

on the return of Sir Charles Warren’s Expedition, I was asked by the late Lord Rosmead (then Sir Hercules Robinson) to undertake the Administration of the Government of British Bechuanaland with supreme judicial as well as executive powers, and also the duties of President of the Land Court and Deputy High Commissioner, and I subsequently became Resident Commissioner for the Bechuanaland Protectorate and the Kalahari, with jurisdiction up to the Zambesi. I need hardly say that this multiplicity of duties necessitated a great deal of travelling about, and an intimate acquaintance with all sorts and conditions of men throughout that vast territory. I found British Bechuanaland in a state of chaos. After ten years of very hard work I left it and all its inhabitants peaceful and prosperous. During the whole of that time I managed to maintain friendly relations with the Transvaal Government, in spite of the bitter feeling of many disappointed freebooters, and of the numerous difficulties which from time to time arose on the border. Throughout my tenure of office I remained on the best terms with the comparatively large Dutch population of British Bechuanaland, which included many farmers from the Transvaal and the Orange Free State as well as from the Cape Colony. I had many conferences with them, and knew them well. I mention these facts for two reasons : first, in order to prove that I am well acquainted with the subject on which I have been asked to write; and secondly, in order to show that I am entirely free from prejudice against the Boers, as they are called. The friendly feeling invariably exhibited towards me personally by the Dutch throughout South Africa suffices to prove this. I entertain sincere admiration for their many sterling qualities, and I can truly say that the Dutch inhabitants of South Africa have no more sincere well-wisher than I am. I therefore feel no hesitation in expressing my views on the present crisis.

In the brief observations which I have to make I do not propose to go over the oft-told tale of the political blunders of Mr. Gladstone, or of those who followed his lead. I do not even wish to dwell on the details of the bad faith and tyranny of the Pretoria Government,

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