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ERRATA.

Page 351 hine 23, for bull read bullock. 491 7 read There is a trough fixed behind the waggon

when travelling; when in the cities it is put on the pole, which is held up like the pole of a curricle, and two horses are placed on each side, to feed: the waggon, being covered with a cloth extended by hoops, is set so as to form a shelter for the horses, as they remain in the streets day

and night, during the most severe weather.
590 .. 5 read the inhabitants of which obtain from Bal-

timore all, &c.
669, et passim, for Boadley, read Bordley.

is

A M E R IC A.

PART II.

SECTION XIV. The Culture and Produce of JWheat, Barley,

Oats, and Rye. THE manner of preparing land for every crop of grain being so fully explained in a former section, it is needless to say any more on that head, except on potatoe land, which is generally a small proportion; as all grain is sown after either Indian corn, potatoes, tobacco, or cotton. I never saw any fresh land broken up as in England for oats or wheat: probably because what is termed fresh land is the best for Indian corn, which is the most sheltering crop to keep off the rays of the hot sun from the soil that can be produced in America, for the whole of the summer; and I believe it is PART. II, * x . . . .

the best preparation for wheat or any grain crop for the ensuing season. Although the American planters and farmers say that Indian corn and tobacco ruin their land, I am convinced the contrary is the fact, The climate is the cause of the soil being so poor. Fourteen days’ hot sun scorches up the grass much in England; but what would be the effect of eight months' continued much hotter sun, the winter then setting-in in the course of two days with a severer frost than the sharpest we ever experience, and that generally without snow * When snow falls in America, there is always sun sufficient during the following day to melt it, and expose the soil to the frost. Under those circumstances grass cannot grow, and for want of produce all soils will become poor.

The quantity of seed sown for grain crops is from three to four pecks; I believe as often three as four. When I first got into the country, I supposed there might be an advantage in sowing more seed: but I was soon convinced to the

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TOUR IN AMERICA,

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1798, 1799, AND 1800.
ExhibiTING

SKETCHES OF SOCIETY AND MANNERS,
a ND
A PARTICULAR ACCOUNT

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PRINTED FOR. J. HARD ING, ST. JAMEs's-stro EET ;
AND J. MURRAY, FLEET-STREET.

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