A Tour in America in 1798, 1799, and 1800: Exhibiting Sketches of Society and Manners, and a Particular Account of the American System of Agriculture, with Its Recent Improvements, Volume 2

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Page 691 - Those who labour in the earth are the chosen people of God, if ever he had a chosen people, whose breasts he has made his peculiar deposit for substantial and genuine virtue. It is the focus in which he keeps alive that sacred fire, which otherwise might escape from the face of the earth. Corruption of morals in the mass of cultivators is a phenomenon of which no age nor nation has furnished an example.
Page 693 - The mobs of great cities add just so much to the support of pure government, as sores do to the strength of the human body.
Page 692 - ... of which no age nor nation has furnished an example. It is the mark set on those, who, not looking up to heaven, to their own soil and industry, as does the husbandman, for their subsistence, depend for it on casualties and caprice of customers. Dependence begets subservience and venality, suffocates the germ of virtue, and prepares fit tools for the designs of ambition.
Page 692 - Dependence begets subservience and venality, suffocates the germ of virtue, and prepares fit tools for the designs of ambition. This, the natural progress and consequence of the arts, has sometimes perhaps been retarded by accidental circumstances; but, generally speaking, the proportion which the aggregate of the other classes of citizens bears in any State to that of its husbandmen, is the proportion of its unsound to its healthy parts, and is a good enough barometer whereby to measure its degree...
Page 693 - Carpenters, masons, smiths, are wanting in husbandry ; but, for the general operations of manufacture, let our workshops remain in Europe. It is better to carry provisions and materials to workmen there, than bring them to the provisions and materials, and with them their manners and principles.
Page 698 - Pieces. To which are prefixed a biographical Sketch of his Life, and a critical Account of his Writings.
Page 406 - ... night, of a putrid sore throat, an inflammatory complaint frequent in America. I conceive it to be occasioned by a poisonous insect received in with the breath. I am of opinion that the General never knowingly did any thing wrong, but did to all men as he would they should do to him.
Page 693 - While we have land to labour then, let us never wish to see our citizens occupied at a workbench, or twirling a distaff. Carpenters, masons, smiths, are wanting in husbandry; but, for the general operations of manufacture, let our workshops remain in Europe.
Page 401 - I think a large number of negroes to require as severe discipline as a company of soldiers :. and that may be one and the great cause why General Washington: managed his negroes better than any other man, he being brought up to the army^ and by nature industrious beyond any description, and in regularity the same.
Page 698 - THE REVOLUTIONARY PLUTARCH ; exhibiting the most distinguished Characters, Literary, Military, and Political, in the recent Annals of the French Republic.

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