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The Vermont State Agricultural Experiment Station was established in accordance with an act of the General Assembly, approved November 24, 1886, for the purpose of promoting agriculture by: scientific investigation and experiment. The station was established in connection with the University of Vermont and State Agricultural College, and for the past eleven years has received the funds appropriated by congress under the provisions of the act commonly known as the “ Hatch Act,” approved March 2, 1887. The state appropriation expired in 1890. An appropriation "not to exceed $1000 annually” was made by the last legislature for the purpose of printing the annual report.

The station is prepared to analyze and test fertilizers, cattle foods, seeds, milk, and other agricultural materials and products--exclusive of waterto identify grasses, weeds, blights, etc., and insects, and to give information on various subjects of agricultural science for the use and advantage of the citizens of Vermont.

All chemical analyses, etc., proper to an experiment station, that can be used for the public benefit, will be made without charge, so far as time and means permit. The station will undertake no work the results of which are not at its disposal to use or publish if deemed advisable for the public good. The results of each analysis will be promptly communicated to the party sending the sample. Those that are of general interest will be published in the annual report or in bulletins for free distribution. The work of the year will be summed up in the annual report of the station.

It is the wish of the Board of Control to make the station as widely useful as its resources will admit. Every Vermont citizen who is concerned in agriculture, whether farmer, manufacturer or dealer, has the right to apply to the station for any assistance that comes within its province to render, and the station will respond so far as it lies in its power. All communications, relating to agriculture, horticulture, plant or animal diseases, insects, etc., will be fairly considered, and, so far as possible, promptly answered.

The station farm and buildings are on the Williston road, adjoining the university grounds on the east. Electric cars pass within a quarter of a mile of the station building, at Colchester Avenue and University Place. Both the station and the farm have telephone connections and may be spoken from most telephone offices in the state.

Instructions for taking samples of fertilizers, fodders, milk, etc., will be sent on application. Parties desiring to send samples should first write for these directions. Many samples received are useless, being incorrectly drawn. Parcels by express, to receive attention, should be prepaid and should bear the address of the shipper for purposes of identification.

Copies of the reports and bulletins of the station are sent free of charge to any address upon application. Address all communications, not to individual officers, but to the

EXPERIMENT STATION, BURLINGTON, Vr.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Bulletin No. 66.—Club-root and black rot: Two diseases of the cab-

bage and turnip....

1-16

I. Summary:

3

II. Introduction...

5

III. Club-root.

1. Nature and occurrence..

5–10

2. Remedial measures....

10-12

IV. Black rot....

1. Nature and occurrence.

13-15

2. Remedial measures....

15-16

Bulletin No. 67.-Hybrid plums.

1-30

I. Summary

3

II. Hybrid plums..

4-23

1. Descriptive and historical notes..

5-22

2. On certain

groups of hybrids....

22-23

III. Hybridity among plums...

24-30

1. Trustworthy evidences of hybridity..

24

2. Classification as affected by hybridity.

24-26

3. Extent and limits of hybridity in plums.... 26–28

4. Utility of the several species in hybridizing....... 28–29

5. Plum-growing as affected by the hybrids.

30

Bulletin No. 68.-Inspections of milk-tests and feeding-stuffs.. 31-38

I. Introductory statement... .....

33-34

II. Text of the laws...

35-37

III. Essentials of the laws....

37-38

Bulletin No. 69.-Analyses of commercial fertilizers...

39-53

I. Statement regarding analyses.....

II. Schedule of trade values..

41-16

III. Observance of the fertilizer law.....

47

IV. Licensed fertilizers sampled by station......

48–50

V. Analyses of licensed fertilizers...

51-53

Bulletin No. 70. —Analyses of commercial fertilizers...

54-68

I. Statement regarding collection of samples....

55-56

II. Licensed fertilizers sampled by station....

57-59

III. Analyses of licensed fertilizers....

60-66

IV. Brands not reported in this bulletin..

67-68

Bulletin No. 71.-Analyses of commercial fertilizers....

69-116

I. Summary:

71

II. Results of inspection...

72-85

1. Guaranties and analyses...

73–76

2. Sources of plant food....

76–79
3. Relation of selling prices and guaranties.. 79–85
III. Licensed fertilizers sampled by station..

85-88
IV. Analyses of licensed fertilizers..

.89–100

V. Comparison, 1898 and 1899.

101-103

VI. Analyses for five years.....

103-113

VII. Miscellaneous fertilizing materials.

..114-116

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OF TWELFTH ANNUAL REPORT

Officers of the station

118

Announcement...

119

Table of contents..

120

Financial reports..

122

Report of the director, by J. L. Hills..

124

Abstracts of bulletins.....

.133-136

No. 66. Club root and black rot-two diseases of the cabbage

and turnip, by L. R. Jones......

133

No. 67. Hybrid plums, by F. A. Waugh...

134

No. 68. Inspections of milk-tests and feeding stuffs, by J. L.

Hills. .....

134

Nos. 69, 70, 71. Analyses of commercial fertilizers, by J. L.

Hills, C. H. Jones and B. O. White.......

135

Report of the chemists, by C. H. Jones and B. 0. White..

.137-150

Further notes on organic nitrogen availability.

137

Concentrated feeding stuffs........

139

The “milk-test inspection law”.

143

Miscellaneous analyses.....

145

Report of the botanists, by L. R. Jones and W. A. Orton...............151-188

Potato diseases and their remedies..

151

Apple diseases and their remedies...

156

A second partial list of the parasites fungi of Vermont.... 161

Killing weeds with chemicals......

182

Report of the horticulturist, by F. A. Waugh..

.189-251

The pollination of plums.....

189

Types of European plums in America..

210

Hybrid plumns........

218

Geography of variation in the genus Prunus in America......... 231

Field notes on cherries.....

240

Dairying, by J. L. Hills.........

.252-309

Feeding tests and their methods...........

253

The effect of food upon the quality of butter.

296

Record of the station herd for 1897–98. ...

299

Sundry forage crops.........

308

The effect of fatigue upon the quantity and quality of milk...... 309

Appendix containing condensed data pertaining to article on

Feeding tests and their methods"

310

Index (in general edition).........

311

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