An Historical Review of the State of Ireland from the Invasion of that Country Under Henry II. to Its Union with Great Britain on the First of January 1801...

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W. F. McLaughlin and Bartholomew Graves, 1805 - Ireland

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Page 41 - ... the Pope or any other authority or person whatsoever, or without any hope of any such dispensation from any person or authority whatsoever, or without thinking that I am or can be acquitted before God or man or absolved of this declaration or any part thereof, although the Pope or any other person or persons or power whatsoever should dispense with or annul the same, or declare that it was null and void from the beginning.
Page 41 - ... that no faith is to be kept with Heretics;—! further declare, that it is no article of my faith, and that I do renounce, reject, and abjure, the opinion that Princes excommunicated by the Pope and Council, or...
Page 300 - That a claim of any body of men, other than the king, lords, and commons of Ireland to make laws to bind this kingdom, is unconstitutional, illegal, and a grievance.
Page 58 - The landlord of an Irish estate inhabited by Roman Catholics is a sort of despot, who yields obedience, in whatever concerns the poor, to no law but that of his will.
Page 90 - ... cause will live; and though the public speaker should die, yet the immortal fire shall outlast the organ which conveyed it, and the breath of liberty, like the word of the holy man, will not die with the prophet, but survive him. I shall move you, " That the King's most excellent Majesty, and the Lords and Commons of Ireland, are the only power competent to make laws to bind Ireland.
Page 40 - Him or Them : And I do faithfully promise to maintain, support, and defend, to the utmost of my Power, the Succession of the Crown, which Succession, by an Act, intituled An Act for the further Limitation of the Crown, and better securing the Rights and Liberties of the Subject...
Page 276 - That as Men and as Irishmen, as Christians and as protestants, we rejoice in the relaxation of the Penal Laws against our Roman Catholic fellow-subjects, and that we conceive the measure to be fraught with the happiest consequences to the union and prosperity of the inhabitants of Ireland.
Page 106 - When the people conceive that laws, and tribunals, and even popular assemblies, are perverted from the .ends of their institution, they fmd in those names of degenerated establishments only new motives to discontent. Those bodies, which, when full of life and beauty, lay in their arms, and were their joy and comfort, when dead and putrid, become but the more loathsome from remembrance of former endearments.
Page 41 - I do declare, that I do not believe that the Pope of Rome, or any other foreign prince, prelate, person, state, or potentate, hath or ought to have any temporal or civil jurisdiction, power, superiority or pre-eminence, directly or indirectly, within this realm.
Page 294 - British legislature, and concluded with moving for leave to bring in a bill to repeal so much of the act of the 6th of George I.

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