The London Magazine, Volume 17

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Page 228 - Try me, good king : but let me have a lawful trial, and let not my sworn enemies sit as my accusers and judges ; yea, let me receive an open trial, for my truth shall fear no open shame...
Page 141 - The time would e'er be o'er, And I on thee should look my last, And thou shouldst smile no more ! And still upon that face I look, And think 'twill smile again; And still the thought I will not brook, That I must look in vain. But when I speak — thou dost not say What thou ne'er left'st...
Page 312 - So flew'd, so sanded ; and their heads are hung With ears that sweep away the morning dew ; Crook-knee'd, and dew-lapp'd like Thessalian bulls ; Slow in pursuit, but match'd in mouth like bells, Each under each.
Page 464 - For him there is no longer any future, His life is bright — bright without spot it was And cannot cease to be. No ominous hour Knocks at his door with tidings of mishap. Far off is he, above desire and fear ; No more submitted to the change and chance Of the unsteady planets.
Page 562 - If you see another instrument or animal, in some respects like, but differing in other particulars, you find it pleasing to compare them together, and to note in what they agree, and in what they differ. Now, all this kind of gratification is of a pure and disinterested nature, and has no reference to any of the common purposes of life; yet it is a pleasure — an enjoyment. You are nothing the richer for it; you do not gratify your palate or any other bodily appetite ; and yet it is so pleasing,...
Page 217 - Kings are commonly said to have long hands ; I wish they had as long ears. Princes in their infancy, childhood, and youth are said to discover prodigious...
Page 141 - And still upon that face I look, And think 'twill smile again ; And still the thought I will not brook That I must look in vain ! But when I speak — thou dost not say What thou ne'er left'st unsaid ; And now I feel, as well I may, Sweet Mary...
Page 562 - You, accordingly make inquiries ; you feel a gratification in getting answers to your questions, that is, in receiving information, and in knowing more, — in being better informed than you were before. If you...
Page 566 - ... between the foot and the glass or wall. The consequence of this is, that the air presses the foot on the wall with a very considerable force compared to the weight of the fly ; for if its feet are to its body in the same...
Page 566 - In the large feet of those animals. the contrivance is easily observed, of the toes and muscles, by which the skin of the foot is pinned down, and the air excluded in the act of walking or climbing ; but it is the very same, only upon a larger scale, with the mechanism of a fly's or a butterfly's foot ; and both operations, the climbing of the seahorse on the ice, and the creeping of the fly on the window or the ceiling, are performed exactly by the same power, the weight of the atmosphere, which...

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