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what abuses, yet existing, are the opinions of men attached to popular rights the most warmly expressed? The coercion of Electors-the monopoly of the Landowners ;- the Government has advanced as far in remedial measures as numerical force will allow. The Vote by Ballot, and the Repeal of the Coro Laws, are Open questions. Let the people look back when they please to the struggles of this Ministry-it is the people's banner ihat floats above the contest—it is the people's cause that has triumphed, and which yet animates to farther exertions.

But there are some persons who persist in regarding only what the Ministry has not done. In vain we point out to them what it has done. They are worthy rivals of a certain Pere Londre, who, in a Register of the times, thus recorded the battle of the Boyne :- The battle of the Boyne-Schomberg is killed there at the head of the English. Certainly Schomberg was killed; but it is no less true that his army achieved a great victory. No doubt, in any new edition of his Register, the worthy Pere Londre would still pertinaciously print The • battle of the Boyne-Schomberg is killed there at the head of • the English! Do what you will lo explain the whole truth, there ever are in politics Peres Londre enough to dwell only on the one fact! Tell them all that the Government has done, and they still persist in recording their deeds by a reference to, something that the Government has not effected. They can never allow the victory gained; they can only insist on their Schomberg killed.

The great questions not yet settled, we have no doubt the Government, whatever the result, will fairly grapple with, at the commencement of the next session. We look with sanguine expectation to their strengthening our colonial empire, by a matured and comprehensive scheme for the constitutional pacification of the Canadas. In domestic reforms, we hope for an efficient amelioration in the Laws; and we cannot here withhold the expression of our trust and belief, that, amongst the earliest measures laid before Parliament, will be one for the better and more effectual working of the machinery of the Reform Bill.

We make no apology for entering at such length into the circumstances connected with last Session, the acts of Ministers, and the state of Parties. The condition of the country and the aspect of the times fully warrant our details. With the fate of the present Government rests, for a time at least, the result of that most momentous experiment which the Whigs have been the first to make in the history of this country, namely, WasTHER REFORM IS TO BE A PRINCIPLE OF OPPOSITION OR OF ADMI

As yet they have succeeded in the noble attempt

NISTRATION.

to enrol amongst the servants of the Crown the advocates and champions of popular improvement. The struggle carried on is, in fact, that between a portion of the aristocracy and those most influenced by the habits and prejudices of aristocratic policy, (not scrupling to seek an alliance wherever political intemperance can be found,) and a Ministry supported by the Commops and favoured by ihe Crown. In this crisis, we may be forgiven if we have too largely expressed that interest in public affairs which all men of all parties must deeply feel,

NOTE to the Article on the Ministerial Plan of Education.

AVING, since the above article was printed, received a copy Hof the cation of the late Parliamentary Grant for Education, we think it may be useful to make our readers acquainted, by means of it, with the Regulations by which the Council have resolved to regulate the appropriation of the Grant for the present year. We therefore here annex the Minute containing them.

• EXTRACT from Minutes of the Committee of Council on

Education, 24th September 1839.

The Lords of the Committee deliberated as to the best manner of effecting the objects contemplated in the vote of the last Session. The sum voted is L.30,000; the number of applications is already 307; the number of scholars to be educated in the proposed schools is 58,302; and the amount applied for is L.48,590.

• The Lords of the Committee observe, that, in a large proportion of the applications now before them, the memorialists have commenced, or undertaken, the erection of schoolhouses, in the expectation of receiving pecuniary assistance from her Majesty's Government, upon conditions similar to those which were required by the Lords of the Treasury; and the Lords of the Committee resolve to be guided by the regulations contained in the Treasury Minutes, in so far as will be consistent with the terms of her Majesty's Order in Council of 3d June 1839.

• The following Regulations will therefore govern the appropriation of the sum intrusted to the superintendence of the Committee for the present year:

* REGULATIONS.

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1. Every application for a grant is to be made in the form of a memorial, addressed, "To the Right Honourable the Lords w of the Committee of Council on Education."

• 2. The Committee will consider the memorials in order, according to the dates at which they have been or shall be received.

•3. The right of inspection will be required by the Committee in all cases. Inspectors, authorized by her Majesty iu Council, will be appointed from time to time, to visit schools to be henceforth aided by public money. The Inspectors will not interfere with the religious instruction, or discipline, or management of the school, it being their object to collect facts and information, and to report the result of their inspections to the Committee of Council.

• 4. Before any application for aid shall be entertained, the Committee will require to be satisfied-by reference either to the Inspectors, or to the National or British and Foreign School Society, or, if the school be in Scotland, to some competent authority there

Ist, That the case is deserving of assistance.
2d, That there are no charitable or other sunds or endow-

ments which might supersede the necessity of a grant.
3d, That the site of the school-house has been obtained
with a good legal tenure, and that by conveyance to
trustees it has been duly secured for the education of the

children of the poor.
4th, That it is reasonable to expect that the school will be

efficiently and permanently supported. • 5. The Committee will require that every building, on behalf of which any application is entertained, shall be of substantial erection, and that in the plans thereof not less than six square feet be provided for each child.

• 6. All recipients of grants will be required to bind themselves to submit to any audit of their building account, and to furnish any reports of their schools which the Committee of Council may require.

7. The Committee will require that the certificate hereto annexed shall be signed by the applicants and presented to the Committee, before their Lordships will authorize the payment of any grant which may be made to a school.

18. In all ordinary cases, the grants will be made in aid of the erection of School-houses (exclusive of residence for master or assistant) upon the following further conditions :

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• Ist, That for every 10s. to be granted by the Committee,

the means of edncating one child (at least) shall be pro-
vided.
2d, That the amount of private subscription shall be re-
ceived, expended, and accounted for, before their Lord-

ships will authorize the payment of the grant. • 9. In every application for aid to the erection of a Schoolhouse in England or Wales, it must be stated whether the school is in connexion with the National Society, or British and Foreign School Society; and if the said school be not in connexion with either of those societies, the Committee will not entertain the case, unless some special circumstances be exhibited to induce their Lordships to treat the case as special.

• 10. Under the head of special, the following may be included:

· 1st, Cases of peculiar urgency arising in poor and popu

lous places.
2d, Peculiar cases in which sums may be required for the

aid and support of existing schools.
3d, Cases of schools in England or Wales, which are not
connected with the National or British and Foreign So-
ciety.

CERTIFICATE.

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We, the undersigned, promoters of the school at hereby certify, for the information of the Right Honourable the Lords of the Committee of Council on Education

• 1 st, That the new school-house, in aid of which your Lordships were pleased to grant L.

is completed in a satisfactory and workmanlike manner; being built of the proper dimensions, and in all respects according to the plan and specification proposed to, and approved by, your Lordships.

• 2d, that the amount of private subscription, specified in our memorials to your Lordships, has been received, expended and accounted for, and that there does not remain any debt, charge, or claim of any kind on account of the building, except what will be liquidated by your Lordships' grant; the payment of which is now prayed for.

3d, That the site of the school-house has been obtained with a good legal tenure, and bas been duly conveyed to trustees, so as to secure the building for the purpose of educating the children of the poor.

4th, That we are ready to submit to any audit of our accounts for building which your Lordships may direct; to make such periodical reports respecting the state of our schools as your Lordships may call for; and to admit your Lordships' inspectors, according to the annexed regulation marked A.

• In testimony whereof, we aflix our signatures, and request the payment of the sum appropriated to the school at aforesaid.

Signed and dated

REGULATION A.

• The right of inspection will be required by the committee in all cases. Inspectors authorized by her Majesty in Council will be appointed from time to time to visit schools to be henceforth aided by public money. The inspectors will not interfere with the religious instruction, or discipline, or management of the school, it being their object to collect facts and information, and to report the result of their inspections to the Committee of Council.

No. CXLII. will be Published in January.

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