An account of the state of agriculture & grazing in New South Wales

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Page 180 - ... fleece is in a fit state to shear, which, in general, is the case about the third or fourth day after the washing. From this account of the ordinary duty of a shepherd in New South Wales, it will be seen that almost any one is capable of taking charge of a flock. Sheep are subject to very few diseases, and with the treatment of these either the master or the overseer will be conversant. In such cases, the shepherd has only to follow diligently the directions he may receive from those under whose...
Page 181 - ... a considerable sum yearly, more particularly should he learn to shear, by which he may put a few pounds into his pocket every summer, in addition to his wages ; and still more so, should he, by care and good management, get charge of a breeding flock, and obtain a prize for rearing a large number of lambs. Again, if he be the father of a family, with two or three sons, from twelve to fifteen, or seventeen years...
Page 180 - ... in and out, and shifts the hurdles. Nor is the life of a shepherd at all irksome to those who have been accustomed to sedentary occupations. On the contrary, such persons have, in various instances, become strongly attached to it, which will not seem surprising when it is considered that it is a life of very great ease and freedom from care. Indeed, it is commonly remarked of...
Page 3 - It is, however, a long-established regulation of the government, that no land can be sold beyond their limits. The extreme boundaries of county lands have come, therefore, to be called the boundaries of location ; and accordingly as lands lie within or beyond those boundaries, a different system is followed in the management and civil government of them. Within the boundaries the whole country is divided into police districts, each having a bench of petty sessions, and generally a stipendiary magistrate...
Page 43 - The flesh of the wallaby is of a much finer flavour than the others. The brush kangaroo is found among rocks and places difficult of access. It differs from the other species in having a long bushy tail. The kangaroo rat and kangaroo mouse are two varieties of the same species ; the former is about the size of a rabbit, the latter is considerably smaller ; they also have the ventral sac or pouch on the lower part of the stomach. They prowl at night, and sleep during the day. The flesh of all the...
Page 180 - ... difficult to shake off, however unsuitable to the new position in which he is placed. In proof of this it may be noticed, that some of the best superintendents of sheep in the colony are natives of London, Manchester, or Birmingham; and that few professed English or Scotch shepherds are intrusted with the care even of a single flock.
Page 180 - ... the hurdles. Nor is the life of a shepherd at all irksome to those who have been accustomed to sedentary occupations: on the contrary, such persons have in various instances become strongly attached to it; which will not seem surprising, when it is considered that it is a life of very great ease and freedom from care. Indeed, it is commonly remarked of the shepherds, that they are more healthy and seem much more cheerful and contented than any other class of farm-servants.
Page 3 - Country is also roughly divided ^Jjfn^'ratiors into Districts, in each of which there is a Commissioner of Crown within and Lands, who is the Chief Magistrate of it, and has under his boundaries command a small force of Mounted Constahles, who in order that of location. they may be distinguished from the more regular Mounted Police of the Colony, are called by the name of the Border Police.
Page 4 - Sydney, and the consequent difficulty in getting the supplies of which they stand in need, and also in sending their produce, and specially their wool, to market. The necessity of opening a shorter communication with the sea leads to the formation of new roads; and in this way roads, or rather routes, are now being opened to the sea...
Page 179 - The shepherd is required to take his sheep from the fold in the morning, not later than an hour after sunrise; to keep sight of them on the pastures throughout the day, and to bring them back at sunset to the fold. They are then counted over, and left in charge of the night watchman ; whose duty it is to take care of the flocks in the folds until the morning ; when each flock is again counted, and delivered over to the shepherd. In the...

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