Louisiana Historical Quarterly, Volume 1

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Page 80 - ... the Atlantic side of the Union, directed by an indissoluble community of interest as one nation. Any other tenure by which the West can hold this essential advantage, whether derived from its own separate strength, or from an apostate and unnatural connection with any foreign power, must be intrinsically precarious.
Page 80 - The West derives from the East supplies requisite to its growth and comfort ; and, what is perhaps of still greater consequence, it must of necessity owe the secure enjoyment of indispensable outlets for its own productions to the weight, influence, and the future maritime strength of the Atlantic side of the Union, directed by an indissoluble community of interest as one nation.
Page 289 - Have you ever, when completely awake, had a vivid impression of seeing or being touched by a living being or inanimate object, or of hearing a voice; which impression, so far as you could discover, was not due to any external physical cause?
Page 62 - The journal of Andrew Ellicott, late commissioner on behalf of the United States during part of the year 1796, the years 1797, 1798, 1799, and part of the year 1800, for determining the boundary between the United States and the possessions of His Catholic Majesty in America...
Page 45 - Description of East- Florida, with a Journal, kept by John Bartram of Philadelphia, Botanist to his Majesty for The Floridas ; upon A Journey from St. Augustine up the River St. John's, as far as the Lakes.
Page 29 - New Voyages to North- America. Containing an Account of the several Nations of that vast Continent; their Customs, Commerce...
Page 330 - That in all that Territory ceded by France to the United States, under the name of Louisiana, which lies north of Thirty-six degrees and thirty minutes north latitude, not included within the limits of the state contemplated by this act, slavery and involuntary servitude, otherwise than in the punishment of crimes whereof the parties shall have been duly convicted, shall be and is hereby forever prohibited.
Page 337 - I am compelled to declare it as my deliberate opinion that if this bill passes, the bonds of this Union are virtually dissolved; that the States which compose it are free from their moral obligations, and that as it will be the right of all, so it will be the duty of some, to prepare definitely for a separation, amicably if they can, violently if they must.
Page 34 - A Description of the English Province of Carolina. By the Spaniards called Florida, and by the French La Louisiane.
Page 341 - Woods ; thence through the said lake to the most north-western point thereof, and from thence on a due west course to the river Mississippi ; thence by a line to be drawn along the middle of the said river Mississippi until it shall intersect the northernmost part of the thirty-first degree of north latitude...

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