The Journal of Anatomy and Physiology, Volume 17

Front Cover
Macmillan, 1883 - Anatomy
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 403 - The excito-sccretory action of the salt is probably due to the bitterness as well as to the irritant and specific properties of the salt, and not to osmosis. 3. The low diffusibility of the salt impedes the absorption of the secreted fluid.
Page 330 - Society publications, vol. zi, 1861. would appear that they have not received the attention they deserve. Wyllie points out that Czermak was probably deceived in regard to the second factor in the closure of the glottis. Czermak thought that the superior vocal cords approach the inferior, so as to obliterate the ventricles of Morgagni, at the same time that they also meet in the median line.
Page 403 - Purgation will not ensue if water be withheld from the diet for one or two days previous to the administration of the salt in a concentrated form. 7. The absence of purgation is not due to the want of water in the alimentary canal, but to its deficiency in the blood. 8. Under ordinary conditions, with an unrestricted supply of water, the maximal amount of fluid accumulated within the canal corresponds very nearly to the quantity of water required to form a 5 or 6 per cent.
Page 405 - According as the salt-solution within the intestine increases in amount, there occurs a corresponding diminution of the fluids of the blood. 33. The blood recoups itself in a short time by absorbing from the tissues a nearly equal quantity of their fluids. 34. The salt, after some hours, causes diuresis, and with it a second concentration of the blood, which continues so long as the diuresis is active. 35. As the intestinal secretion excited by the salt contains a very small proportion of organic...
Page 333 - ... could exert a valvular action which would seem to be sufficient to prevent the exit of air, and in the expiratory movement it vibrates with the impulse of the passing air. Cuvier* has shown that there is neither ventricle nor false cord to be found in the glottis of the Bradypus. Class III. — Man and the greater part of Ungulate mammals are to be referred to this class, though others have the cavernous glottis which is embraced in the fourth and final division. Here the vocal cords are not...
Page 403 - Oceteris paribus, the weaker, or in other words, the more voluminous the solution of the salt administered is, the more quickly is the maximum within the canal reached; and accordingly purgation follows with greater rapidity.
Page 404 - ... administered per os, as the strong solution becomes diluted in the stomach and duodenum before passing into the intestine generally, 22. The difference is due to the local action of the salt on the mucous membrane, and probably more to an impeded absorption than to a stimulated secretion. 23. When the salt is administered in the usual manner, it appears, in the case of...
Page 329 - These threefold occurrences in the hermetic closure of the larynx explain the resistance which the glottis successfully opposes to the pressure of the air, without a development of much force during the effort.
Page 442 - This band is situated near the commencement of the more conically shaped part of the pyloric extremity, three or four inches from the smaller end. In attempting to pass a long glass thermometer tube, through the aperture, into the pyloric portion of the stomach,, during the latter stages of digestion, a forcible contraction is first perceived at this. point, and the bulb is stopped. In a short time, there is a gentle relaxation, when the bulb passes without difficulty, and appears to be drawn, quite...
Page 442 - In attempting to pass a long glass thermometer tube through the aperture into the pyloric portion of the stomach, during the latter stages of digestion, a forcible contraction is first perceived at this point, and the bulb is stopped. In a short time, there is a gentle relaxation, when the bulb passes without difficulty, and appears to be drawn, quite forcibly, for three or four inches, towards the pyloric end. It is then released, and forced back, or suffered to rise again ; at the same time giving...

Bibliographic information