The Reformed Confessions

Front Cover
Presbyterian Publishing Corp, Apr 1, 1998 - Religion - 336 pages

In this volume, the internationally respected theologian Jan Rohls chronicles the dynamic tradition of Reformed confessions of faith from the sixteenth century through the first third of the twentieth century. He discusses theological themes and positions that have informed both the tradition in its entirety and also particular confessions, concluding with the Theological Declaration of Barmen in 1934. An introduction by Jack L. Stotts discusses Reformed confessions since Barmen.

The Columbia Series in Reformed Theology represents a joint commitment by Columbia Theological Seminary and Westminster John Knox Press to provide theological resources from the Reformed tradition for the church today. This series examines theological and ethical issues that confront church and society in our own particular time and place.

 

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Contents

Preface
3
The Development of
9
The Spread of Calvinism in Western and Eastern Europe
16
The Dordrecht Synod and the Theology of the Netherlands
22
The Theological Contents of
29
Creation and Providence
54
Human Beings and Sin
64
Covenant of Grace and Reconciliation
86
Sanctification and Penance
130
Election and Rejection
148
Word and Sacrament
177
The Double Form of Gods Word
193
Church and State
254
Conciliatory Theology Toleration and
265
of NeoReformed Confessional Writings
281
Notes
303

Christology and the Calvinist Extra Extra Calvinisticum
102
Justification and Faith
117

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1998)

Jan Rohls teaches systematic theology at the University of Munich in Germany.

Bibliographic information