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natural, more true, more according to our feelings, than when in this philosophic age, every school-boy thinks himself a prodigy, because he can repeat after his master that the earth is round?

I am at present with the Prince at one of his hunting-lodges. He is an honest and unaffected man, and I am very well pleased with him: what I dislike, is his talking of things which he has only read or heard of, and always exactly under the same point of view that they have been presented to him. I am sorry to say that he values my understanding and talents much more

highly

highly than that mind, for which alone I value myself—which alone is the source of talents, of happiness, of misery, of every thing —which makes me all I am, and is solely mine.—Any body may know all that I know.

LETTER LI.

May 25. T HAD a scheme in my head, ■*■ which I intended to conceal from you till it was accomplished j—now that it has failed I may as well tell it to you. I had a mind to go into the army; I had long been desirous E 2 of of it, and It was my chief reason for coming here with the Prince. He is a general in the service of the

. As we were walking just

slow, I communicated my design to him: he did not approve it; and it would have been madness not to have yielded to his reason.

LETTER LII.

June 11. O AY what you please, I can stay "-* in this place no longer. What should I do here? I am weary of it. The Prince, it is true, treats me in all respects as his equal, but still I

am

am not at my ease here. Besides, we are at bottom very different men. He has a good understanding, but quite of the common kind; and the pleasure I have in his conversation, is only such as I receive from reading a well-written book. I shall stay a week more here, and then travel about again. What I have done best, since I came to this place, are some drawings. The Prince has some taste for the arts, and would have more, if it was not cramped by cold rules and technical terms. I often lose all patience, when with a glowing imagination I am giving to art and nature the most lively expresE 3 sion, Æon, and he stops me with learned' criticisms, upon which he highly values himself.

LETTER LIII.

June 18. TI7 HERE am I going? I will

TM tell you in confidence: I

am obliged to continue here a. fort

jiight longer-; after that, I thought

it would be expedient for me to see

the mines of——. But 'tis no such

thing; I only deceive myself: the

real truth is, that I wish to be near

Charlotte again. I am not the dupe

ef my heart, but I obey its dictates..

LETTER

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