The Company and the Crown

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Page 245 - The school-boy whips his taxed top — the beardless youth manages his taxed horse, with a taxed bridle on a taxed road ; — and the dying Englishman pouring his medicine, which has paid seven per cent.
Page 245 - ... that comes from abroad, or is grown at home — taxes on the raw material — taxes on every fresh value that is added to it by the industry of man — taxes on the sauce which pampers man's appetite, and the drug...
Page 245 - ... paid a license of an hundred pounds for the privilege of putting him to death. His whole property is then immediately taxed from two to ten per cent Besides the probate, large fees are demanded for burying him in the chancel ; his virtues are handed down to posterity on taxed marble ; and he is then gathered to hia fathers, — to be taxed no more.
Page 245 - TAXES upon every article which enters into the mouth, or covers the back, or is placed under the foot — taxes upon everything which it is pleasant to see, hear, feel, smell, or taste — taxes upon warmth, light, and locomotion — taxes on everything on earth, and the waters under the earth...
Page 174 - The Court of Ava having refused to make amends for the injuries and insults which British subjects had suffered at the hands of its servants, the GovernorGeneral of India in Council resolved to exact reparation by force of arms. The forts and cities upon the coast were forthwith attacked and captured ; the...
Page 175 - Burmah, and is willing to consent that hostilities should cease. But if the King of Ava shall fail to renew his former relations of friendship with the British Government, and if he shall recklessly seek to dispute its quiet possession of the Province it has now declared to be its own, the Governor-General in Council will again put forth the power he holds, and will visit with full retribution aggressions which, if they be persisted in, must of necessity lead to the total subversion of the Burman...
Page 245 - ... raw material ; taxes on every fresh value that is added to it by the industry of man ; taxes on the sauce which pampers man's appetite, and the drug that restores him to health ; on the ermine which decorates the Judge, and the rope which hangs the criminal ; 25 on the poor man's salt, and the rich man's spice ; on the brass nails of the coffin, and the ribbons of the bride ; — at bed or board, couchant or levant, we must pay.
Page 100 - Results like these reflect the highest honour on the administration of your Lordship in Council, and on the system of Indian government generally. It is a source of just pride to us that our services, civil and military, should have afforded men capable, in so short a time, of carrying into full effect such a series of enlightened and beneficent measures.
Page 224 - By the latter end of July all the lower parts of Bengal, contiguous to the Ganges and Burrampooter, are overflowed, and form an inundation of more than a hundred miles in width ; nothing appearing but villages and trees, excepting very rarely the top of an elevated (pot (the artificial mound of fome deferted village) appearing like an if.and.
Page 59 - In many respects the Mahommedan surpassed our rule ; they settled in the countries which they conquered ; they intermixed and intermarried with the natives ; they admitted them to all privileges ; the interests and sympathies of the conquerors and conquered became identified. " Our policy, on the contrary, has been the reverse of this ; cold, selfish, and unfeeling ; the iron hand of power on the one side, monopoly and exclusion on the other.

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