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Christian Church. The wricten experiences of the persons admitted, were read by Mr. Phillips from the desk; and, at the close of each, Dr. Willians, from the pulpit, addressed the person by name, asking, If what was then read, contained the substance of his or her experience &c. Nine of these declarations were thus publicly read ; but, to prevent an undue length of the service, a few more were deferred to a future church-meeting. After this, the persons were addressed as a body, and requested, if they desired to enter into Christian fellowship for the purposes pointed out to them, and approved of each other as fellow-members, to signify it by lifting up the right hand. This they did unanimously. After a short address to them and the spectators, who were numerous, Dr. Williams closed the service with prayer. This young interest is looking forward to a standing ministry among them. May the great Head of spiritual influence favour them with his presence and direction 1,

It is usual with the ministers concerned in formning a church, to recommend a Book of Records, in which they insert an historical account of the rise and progress of the society, and ihe principal transactions relating to it; and to preserve therein a corrected copy of the written ex: periences produced at the admission of every member. Had our forefathers of the last and preceding century punctually followed such a plan for preserving the transactions of their societies re-pectively, of what inestimable value would such records have been, not merely as a matter of curiosity, but also of real use, constituting a most interesting part of Ecclesiastical History.

CHAPEL OPENED. FEB. 28, 1802, a small neat meeting-house was opened at Hedon, market-town in Holderness, in the east riding of Yorkshire. The Gospel was introduced into this place by the Rev. Js. Lyons, and his friends, ia the year 1799. The brethren who go from Hull to preach in the vii. lages, have continued to go to Hedon on Lord's Days, while several of the neighbouring ministers have occasionally preached lectures in the week, and a blessing has attended the word. ' Several persons have been brought to an acquaintance with divine things; a few have become meine bers of the church under the care of Mr. Lyons, at Hull; and others are enquiring the way to Zion. Three places had been licensed, at diffcreat times, for the accommodation of the people at Hedon ; but as it appeared that many were prevented from attending, for want of a more convenient place of worship, it was thought adviseable to erect the present meetinghouse; which is a neat place, pewed to seat about 160 people. Applications having already been made for almost all the seats, it is probable that it will soon be necessary to make two galleries to accommodate about 80 persons more. The expence already incurred is about 300 l. ; Cne half of which, or thereabouts, has been afready collected jo'rouz neigd. bourhood. At the opening there was a crowded and attentive audience. Two Sermons were preached on the occasion by Mr. Js. Lyons, and Mr. Richards, of Hull; the former from Dan. xii. 4. and the latter trona Isaiah ix. 7. The other parts of the service were conducted by the brethren who go from Hull to preach in the villages.

A rootn for preaching has also been taken at Preston, a large village Dear Hedon; and, in future, they intend to have service at borb chose places every Lord's Day, at such times as not to interfere with the church hours.

As this last sheet was going to press, we received intelligence of the death of the Rev. George Duraut, who departed this life on thac againsc.

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HEATHEN SOULS PRECIOUS. , Long thus has stood, and rich forbeata

anoe found; THERE was a man (but ah! his hum- “Then, cut it down ! why cumbers is ble name

the ground ?" Ne'er occupy'd she brazen trump of

Mediation expressed. Fame : No wreaths of science blooin'd upon But hark! the gracious Intercessor's his brow;

voice ; To climb the steep ascent he knew not 'Tis Jesus — in his sympathy rejoice! how)

In Him, what qualities for pleading Born in a barb'rous clime, nor taught meer! to know

His dignity and love alike complete. The God who strings the many-colourd " Ah, spare them, Lord,” he cries bow,

6 another year! Iastructs his orbs and whirlwinds how I'll tend and culture them with ceases to rise,

less care. And darts kis vivid lightnings round " If fruit at length appear, thy grace the skies;

shall shine ; But Jesus knew the purchase of his " If not, thy justice shall be own'a blood,

divine." And sweetly drew the wand'rer home to God.

Expectation suggested. In Indian wilds, a solitary way! Sinners ! if such compassion you neHe walk'd with God, and clos'd his little

glect, day.

What can you but unmingled wrath And now he lives and shines, a spotless

expect? mind,

Oh, seek the Lord, while yet He may His vision clear, and all his thoughts be found 1 refin'd:

His goodness shall o'er all your guilt His pow'rs expand beneath ethereal

abound. skies,

And you who seek him now,-How And still to new degrees of glory rise ;

blest your lor! Soar without drooping, without fainting You ne'er shall be deserted, --he'er run,

forgot, Flourish beneath an intellectual Sun;

When they such grace obtain, who And, as eternal ages roll along,

sought it not. Unweary'd, raise a never-ending song.

MINIMUS. qoiden..........

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EPIGRAM. ANALYSIS OF A SERMON

WHILE some love darkness more than ON LUKE xii. 8.

light, Preached January, 1802.

Through fear of men, for actions.

evil;

Others to noon transform the night,
Provocation implied.

Perhaps, thro' fcar to see the Devil.

Thus opposite effects arise The love supreme of God, his law

From the fame cause, however odd;. demands:

But they may earth and hell despise, Our image, lo! the fruitless fig-tree 1

Who fear an omnipresent God. stands ;

Miximus.

ERRATA in Feb. Mag. - Page 69, line 23, fron bottom, for these read :heir

21, for hanner's read manner

7, after la converds insert a comma

70, 4, from top, after beutiful insert 4, ERRATA in March Page 83, line z from top, for aliene read aligna

83, I, for not all read rint at all. 87, 14 fron boitom, for affliction read affection 120, 2d. column, line 33; for vict's iti read cotrias

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THE

Evangelical Magazine,

FOR MAY, 1802.

MEMOIR OF THE REV. RICHARD TIBBOTT, LATE PASTOR OF THE INDEPENDENT CHURCH ÅT

LLANBRYNMAIR, MONTGOMERYSHIRE. Tais truly venerable servant of Jesus Christ, was born,

January 1719, in the parish of Llanbrynmair, at a place called Havodybant, within less than a mile of the chapel-house, where he lived so long, and where he died. He lived in the same neighbourhood when he began to preach. Both his parents were eminently pious: they had six children, whom, with great care and diligence, they brought up in the fear of the Lord. By a divine blessing on their pious endeavours, five of the children were savingly wrought upon in their youth, who gave themselves unto the Lord and his church; and all continued to a good old age, ornaments of their Christian profession. Mr. Richard Tibbott was the youngest of the children: he was much impressed with the importance of religion from his childhood, and was received into church coinmunion before he attained to the 15th year of his age. Nor are we to suppose that he was deficient in religious knowledge; for his parents had taught him to read when he was very young; and he was able to repeat the whole of the Assembly's Shorter Catechism when he was only seven years of age.

From the time he entered into church-fellowship, his thoughts were so abstracted from all worldly concerns, and so entirely employed in meditation and prayer, that it was thought, by some, he did not possess the proper use of his faculties; but the Lord was now preparing him, in a way far superior to the expectations of his friends, for great usefulness. At this time he possessed such a thirst for knowlege, that he either purchased or borrowed almost all the valuable books in divinity within his reach; and, by indefatigable diligence and labour, obtained a considerable acquaintance with the Latin and Greek languages; nor was he altogether ignorant of the Hebrew. About the year 1741 he went to the Rev, Griffith Jones, VOL. X. Y

of

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