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" Adam's children, being not presently as soon as born under this law of reason, were not presently free; for law, in its true notion, is not so much the limitation as the direction of a free and intelligent agent to his proper interest, and prescribes... "
The History and Principles of the Civil Law of Rome: An Aid to the Study of ... - Page 46
by Sheldon Amos - 1851 - 475 pages
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Two Treatises of Government: By Iohn Locke

John Locke - Liberty - 1764 - 416 pages
...telligent agent to his proper intereft, and prefcribes no farther than is for the general good of thofe under that law : could they be happier without it, the law, as an ufelefs thing, would of itfelf vanifh ; and that ill deferves the name of confinement which hedges...
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Flower's Political review and monthly register. (monthly ..., Volume 9

Benjamin Flower - 1811
...is for the general good of those under that law : csuld they he happier without it, the law, as an useless thing, would of itself vanish; and that ill...name of confinement which hedges, us in only from hugs and precipices. So that, however it may he mistaken, the end of law it not to aholish or restrain,...
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The Works of John Locke, Volume 5

John Locke - 1823
...direction of a free and intelligent agent to his proper interest, and prescribes no farther than is for the general good of those under that law : could they be happier without it, the law, as an useless thing, would of itself vanish ; and that ill deserves the name of confinement which hedges...
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Two Treatises of Government

John Locke - Civil rights - 1824 - 277 pages
...direction of a free and intelligent agent to his. proper interest, and prescribes no farther than is for the general good of those under that law : could...only from bogs and precipices. So that, however it may be mistaken, the end of law is not to abolish or restrain, but to preserve and enlarge freedom...
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The Works of John Locke: Some considerations of the consequences of lowering ...

John Locke - 1824
...di/rection of a free and intelligent agent to his proper interest, and prescribes no farther than is for the general \ good of those under that law : could they be happier f without it, the law, as a useless thing, would of itself vanish ; and that ill deserves the name...
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The Roman Civil Law: Introductory Lecture on the Study of the Roman Civil ...

John Anster - Roman law - 1851 - 51 pages
...disconnected from moral science. The Civil Law is taught in Cambridge as a branch of Ethics. I feel too thatwe cannot move one step without the great classical writers....the end of law is not to * Tractate of Education. ( 46 ) abolish and restrain, but to preserve and enlarge freedom ; for, in all the states of created...
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The History of Political Literature, from the Earliest Times, Volume 1

Robert Blakey - Greece - 1855 - 501 pages
...placuit, legis habet ." > Tractate of Education. reference to the value of legal studies generally, "Law, in its true notion, is not so much the limitation...that, however it be mistaken, the end of law is not to abolish and restrain, but to preserve and enlarge freedom; for, in all the states of created beings...
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Two Treatises on Civil Government: Preceded by Sir Robert Filmer's "Patriarcha".

John Locke - Liberty - 1884 - 320 pages
...direction of a free and intelligent agent to his proper interest, and prescribes no farther than is for the general good of those under that law. Could...deserves the name of confinement, which hedges us hronly from bogs and precipices. So that 56. Adam was created a perfect man, his body and mind in full...
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An Outline of Locke's Ethical Philosophy

Mattoon Monroe Curtis - Ethics - 1890 - 145 pages
...free intelligent agent to his proper interest, and prescribes no further than is for the public good. That ill deserves the name of confinement which hedges...only from bogs and precipices. So that, however it may be mistaken, the 1) Gov. IL 5. 6. 77. 54—55. HU III. i; I. "Kein Mensch wird 'frei geboren',...
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Philosophy and Political Economy in Some of Their Historical Relations

James Bonar - Economics - 1893 - 410 pages
...direction of a free and intelligent agent to his proper interest, and prescribes no further than is for the general good of those under that law ; —...the law as a useless thing would of itself vanish." But the end of law is not to secure the freedom of doing as I please, but the freedom of "disposing...
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