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" Our first thoughts of law, before it becomes a matter of speculation with us, are connected with its restraints, not with the advantages derived from these restraints. As far as the law is from within, — the voice of God echoed in the human heart, —... "
The History and Principles of the Civil Law of Rome: An Aid to the Study of ... - Page 47
by Sheldon Amos - 1851 - 475 pages
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The Roman Civil Law: Introductory Lecture on the Study of the Roman Civil ...

John Anster - Roman law - 1851 - 51 pages
...precipices. So that, however it be mistaken, the end of law is not to * Tractate of Education. ( 46 ) abolish and restrain, but to preserve and enlarge...The imagination is seized and * Of Civil Government. ( 47 ) pre-occupied by this language. We think of law but in its terrors. We do not remember that by...
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The Gentleman's Magazine, and Historical Chronicle, for the Year ..., Volume 189

English essays - 1851
...principle co-existent with man, susceptible of new development with each advance of civilisation — it is a language pointing out our own duties, not...punishments not rewards. The imagination is seized and pre-occupied by this language. We think of law but in its terrors. We do not remember that by it, and...
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The Irish Jurist, Volume 3

Law - 1851
...pointing out our own duties, not sugpsting to us the rewards which arise from their j*r*'orraance. As far as it is from without, — the imperative language...punishments, not rewards. The imagination is seized and pre-occupied by this language. We think of law but in its terrors. We do not remember that by it, and...
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The Dublin university magazine, Volume 37

University magazine - 1851
...principle co-existent with man, susceptible of new development with each advance of civilisation — it is a language pointing out our own duties, not...legislator, addressing all, regarding all as possible offendere — its language is necessarily of menace. The sanctions, which it proclaims as guards of...
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The Dublin University Magazine: A Literary and Political Journal, Volume 37

1851
...principle co-existent with man, susceptible of new development with each advance of civilisation — it is a language pointing out our own duties, not...the rewards which arise from their performance. As f»r as it is from without — the ˇinierativc language of the K-gUldlor, addretting all. regarding...
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