The Mirror: A Periodical Paper, Pub. at Edinburgh in the Years 1779 and 1780, Volume 3

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W. Creech, Edinburgh, and W. Strahan, and T. Cadell, London, 1781 - Periodicals
 

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Page 103 - Men fear Death, as children fear to go in the dark; and as that natural fear in children is increased with tales, so is the other.
Page 239 - And will he not come again? And will he not come again? No, no, he is dead; Go to thy death-bed, He never will come again. His beard was as white as snow All flaxen was his poll, He is gone, he is gone, And we cast away moan: God ha
Page 238 - ... of the] moment, breaks forth into that extravagant rhapsody which he utters to Laertes. Counterfeited madness, in a person of the character I have ascribed to Hamlet, could not be so uniformly kept up, as not to allow the reigning impressions of his mind to show themselves in the midst of his affected extravagance.
Page 328 - Louisa sat down on a withered stump, leaning her cheek upon her hand. After a little while, the bird was scared from its perch, and flitted from the thicket. Louisa rose from the ground, and burst into tears ! She turned — and beheld Sir Edward. His countenance had much of its former languor ; and when he took her hand, he cast on the earth a melancholy look, and seemed unable to speak his feelings. ' Are you not well, Sir Edward ?' said Louisa, with a voice faint and broken. — ' I am ill indeed,'...
Page 137 - I resolved to steal away early in the morning, before any of the family should be astir. About daybreak I got up, and let myself out. At the door I found an old and favourite dog of my friend's, who immediately came and fawned upon me. He walked with me through the park. At the gate he...
Page 249 - I obliged her to be their advocate. I preferred, therefore, being silent on the subject, trusting that a little more experience and knowledge of the world would necessarily weaken their influence. At her age, and with her feelings, it is necessary to have a friend : Emilia had found one at a very early period. Harriet S was the daughter of a neighbour of my brother's, a few years older than my niece.
Page 75 - ... and its constitution is involved in that of England. At the time the two nations came to be so intimately connected, its great men were less affluent than those of England, its agriculture was little advanced, and its manufactures were in their infancy. A Scotsman was, therefore, in this situation, obliged to exert every nerve, that he might be able to hold his place. If preferment, or offices in public life, were his...
Page 324 - ... of the valley ; his daughter's lute was much beyond it ; Sir Edward's violin was finer than either. But his conversation with Louisa — it was that of a superior order of beings!
Page 323 - ... days it abated ; and, in little more than a week, he was able to join in the society of Venoni and his daughter.
Page 332 - Edward's whole tenderness and attention were called forth to mitigate her grief; and, after its first transports had subsided, he carried her to London, in hopes that objects new to her, and commonly attractive to all, might contribute to remove it. With a man possessed of feelings like Sir Edward's, the affliction of Louisa gave a certain respect to his attentions.

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