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between the pompous eulogy and recommendation which you passed upon Mr. Addington and his colleagues in March, 1801, and the vote which you gave to keep censure if not impeachment hanging over their heads in June, 1802, embracing a space of less than fifteen months. Unless, therefore, Sir, you can push your system of exclusion so far as to include the light of changing opinions, as well as of being minister, your conduct, if you can justify it, will alone serve as an ample justification for that on account of which you thought proper to reproach your noble relations. But, there is another circumstance that seems to have been entirely overlooked. You not only reproach them with no longer thinking you the only man capable of restoring vigour to the proceedings of government, but also with having formed a political connexion with Mr. Fox and his friends, as if the implied inconsistency was palpably augmented by this latter circumstance. Why, Sir, this night have been the reason, at least, it was a very good one, for the change in their opinion as to this point. While there was little or no prospect of a junction with Mr. Fox and his party; while the House of Commons was split into so many divisions; while there was no hope (and in November, 1802, there was not the most distant hope) of a coalition comprising a considerable portion of all the great talents and character in the country, then they might think you the only man to whom the nation could look for assistance. But, after that state of things was completely done away, and that, too, without any co-operation on your part, for you did not begin to co-operate till it was evident to all the world that the object would be finally effected without your aid, if that aid was much longer withheld, many of your friends having already joined the opposition ; after this your noble relations, however partial to you, and very partial they certainly were, though not more partial than sincere, might well change their opinion as to your being the only man capable of retrieving the affairs of the nation, ihere being now other men to whom they could look with hope and with confidence.—Mr. Pitt's defence of his six colleagues who made Part of the last ministry, remains to be noticed. “With respect,” said he in his speech of the 18th of June, “ with respect . to any differences of opinion which I may of have had with the late administration, it -- will not, I think, be insisted, that they -- Were of such a nature as to prevent us 44 from acting together in the most cordial o and satisfactory-manner upon affairs in

$oderal. Of these my right hon, and no

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ble friends I uniformly spoke with the greatest private friendship and private good opinion. It is still said, however, that there has not been a sufficient change in the ministry. But, surely, ille right hon. gentleman below (Mr. Addington) must be satisfied that the change is sufficient, and that the present is really a new administration. Two Secretaries of “ State have been changed, Lord Melville had succeeded Lord St. Vincent at the Admiralty; and though I agree in every panegyric on Lord St. Vincent as a seaman, I am convinced that Lord Melville will make a m'. Sh more useful President “ at the Admiralty Board; and though it may not be fit to speak of myself, it surely will not be considered that it is no change that the office of First Lord of the Treasury, reckoned that which has a leading influence in the executive government, is now held by me. Few will doubt that a very real change has taken place." As Mr. Canning was present at this display of his right hon. friend's modesty and lowliness, one wonders not to have heard of his sinking into the earth, or, at least of some striking proof of his mortification and shame. But, to conclude the remarks of Mr. Pitt. “Much complaint,” said he, “ has been “ made of the inefficiency of these minis“ ters; but, will it be asserted, that they “ are not equal to the duties of the statious they fill?" Now, for an answer to this question, I will not refer to the assertions of Mr. Pitt's friends and closest adherents'; I will not appeal to the pamph'et in which Mr. Long, speaking from under the dictation of Mr. Pitt, characterized the late ministry and every part of it as destitute of talent and of energy; I will not cite the speeches of Mr. Canning, who, at the close of a description, loading, nay overcharging with marks of contempt those persons with whom he is now sitting on the Treasury Bench, cried out, as it were in a political phrensy: “ away the measures and give us “ the men " I will not attempt to make Mr. Pitt answerable for the expressio.s and opinions of his adherents with regard to the persons with whom he is now associated in power, I will appeal only to himself. Of his “private feelings or expressions", we can, of course, know nothing; but of his public declarations, as to the utter incapacity of those colleagues whose capacity he now defends, no one, who remembers his memorable speech upon Mr. Fox's motion of the 23d of April, can possibly be ignorant. “ Will it,” said he on the 18th of June, “ be asserted that they are unequal to the “ duties of the stations they fill f" Let us,

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by referring to the speech of the 23d of April, extract the answer from his own lips. “After 12 months of war, preceded by a peace which, by the confession of ministers themselves, was a mere notice of that war, and a war in which they themselves have been exhausted in their skill; and yet, in the course of the whole 12 months, they have brought forward no.

thing in which there has not been a va“, riety of contradictions in the plans, repug“. nancies in the measures, and imbecility in “ the execution. Nothing in which every “step has not been marked by unnecessary

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amounting to a retraction of the principle upon which it was founded. . . Is it upon the wisdom, the vigilance, the energy of these ministers that we are to rely, when we have secn that no one measure for the public service can they be truly said to have originated, while several they have retarded and enfeebled. . . . . . . . . . It is true that ministers, on this, as on former occasions, have given us a pom. pous enumeration of the force of the country” [enuinerations always made by Lord Castlereagh]. “ That spirit and exertion, however, belong to the country, and are not to be ascribed to the direction or the energy of the government. Indeed, if there be any non in this country who ought, upon this score, to separate national pride from any feeling of personal merit, it is the present ministers, who have had so little share in the national energy. No one good measure can they claim as their own; no one measure have they imstroved or/ofected; very many they have weakened by their delays, and destroyed by theit incongruities. Whatever, then, the spirit and zeal of a free and brave people may have been, ought fairly to be separated from the tardiness, languor, and imbecility of ministers in every thing of which they have assumed the direction.” There were ten of these tardy, languid, inconsistent, imbecile gentlemen, six of whom are now in the cabinet with Mr. Pitt, and, it is with respect to these very persons that he now asks, who “will say that they are not equal “ to the duties of the stations they fill !” To comment on such palpable tergiversation would be a waste of the small portion of room I have left; but I cannot resrain from asking, as to the “ very obvious “ change,” where we are to look for any marks of it “It surely,” says Mr. Pitt,

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delay; and at last the measure adopted

will not be considered as no change that the office, lately held by the right hon. gent. is now liclo by me. Few will doubt, that a very real charge has taken place here.” And still fewer will have any doubt as to the feelings which language like this must have excited in the House of Commons. But, as to measures, what change can we discern ? Mr. A. had given notice of his intention to augment the stamp duty to the amount of 8co,oool. Mr. Pitt contents himself with an estimate of 750,000 l. Mr. Pitt is to have three lotteries

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had only two. Mr. A. authorised the bank by an order of council to send forth dollars with the King's head on them : Mr. Pitt sanctions the measure by a law. Under Mr. A. small promissory notes were issued in Ireland instead of silver: Mr. Pitt extends and legalises such issues. Where, in all this, do we discern any effect of that change, which we are taught to regard as so important and striking? Had we seen public credit revive, indeed; had guinea returned to circulation; then we could have borne, with some degree of patience, to be reminded of the change. In the affair of the loyalty loan, a change has really taken place. Mr. A. had determined to proceed agreeably to the decision of the law-officers of the crown ; whereas Mr. Pitt has determined to pass an act directly contrary to that opinion; which act is to be brought into Parliament by those very identical law-officers | There is one other measure in which the change is visible, and that is the military project bill; and this measure received the marked reprobation of a g, eat majority of the memoers of Parliament of the country in which it was to operate. A project which, in every part of the country, has been received with disgust; a project containing much more of the vexatious, inefficient, and ludicrous than any thing proposed by the ministers whom the projector characterised by almost every phrase expressive of ignorance and imbecility.

*...* Several communications having, during the last week, been made to the Editor, upon the subject of the complaints of the JAMA ic A PLANTERs, he thinks it right to notify, that some of them will be published in the next sheet of the Register; and that particular attention will be paid to a correspondence with the Treasury, which one gen: tleman has had the goodness to communiCate.

Printed by Cox and Baylis, No 75, Great Queen Street, and publishsed by R. Bagshaw, Bow Street, Covo Guiden, where former Numbers way be had ; sold also by J. Budd, Crown and Mitre, Pall-Mall.

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“Then you filled the minds of the colonists with new jealousy and all sorts of apprehensions $ “ then it was that they quarrelled with the old taxes as well as with the new ; then it was, and not till then, that they questioned all the parts of your legislative power; and by the battery of such questions bows shaken the solid structure of this empite to its deepest founda“tions.”——Bunke's Speech in the House of Cointuons, April 19, 1774.

65]
CORRESPONDENCE
With the
TREASURY,
RELATIVE TO The DUT i ES ON JAMA ICA
PRODUCE.

It will be seen that the following documents are principally from the pen of CoLoNEL H & N DeR so N, who is well known as a Jon 1.ca planter. My former publication respecting the complaints of the Plauters and the disputes between the Governor and the Legislative Assembly (see present Volume, p. 1), has induced several persons to coinmunicate to me important matter upon those subjects. That part of these commu

nications which I now lay before the public

claim a preference on several accounts; but principally because it fully confirins, in substance, the statement which I thought it my duty to Inake relating to the intolerable hardship at this time experienced by the inporters of rum. To the RT. HoN, will 1 A M P ITT, H is MAJesty's chancello R of THE EXcheau ER, &c. &c. &c. the Memorial of col. John HENDERson, burntly beweth: That your Memorialist humbly subtuits for your perusal the copies, or nearly so, of Letters No. 1, 2, 3, and 4, by your Memorialist, and also a copy of Resolutions, &c. by the West-India Committee of Planters and Merchants, as the same were submitted to ...ar predecessor, [These resolutions will *Jound in the Register, present volume, p. 17. It is very necessary to refer to them.] the Right Hon. Henry Addington, &c. &c. upon the subject of West-India produce. That upon a perusal of these papers, your penetrating eye, Sir, cannot pass unnoticed the distressing situation to which the West-India Planters are reduced; and, you must forcibly *te, that the real interest of this parent state, of which you are again the principal guardian, calls aloud for relief, and an exercise of Jue justice and tendern" sto the planters of her valuable West-India colonies. out your Memorialist's case individually is hard indeed. The bond upon his rum, * stated in his letters, bring nearly expired,

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no demand, no chance of sales, but by sub. mitting to the hard fate of being bought considerably in debt for the duty and expenses, are facts which he is ready to prove, —That instead of obtaining even a temporary relict, as unight have been expected by Mr. Addington's statement to the WestIndia Committee, respecting the use of rum by the navy and army, the price is worse and worse. Your Memorialist, therefore, earnestly prays, that you would be pleased to signify, as to you shall seem meet, that his rum may be purchased at a fair price for the use of the navy and army; or, that the execution of the bond upon it may be sus, pended till relief can be obtained in some

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Six,-Though I class myself only amongst the inferior sugar planters of Jamaica, and feel very inadequate in point of abilities to elucidate the following subject respecting West-India produce, yet I feel not less interested in the issue which may result from it, for seeing no other immediate prospect of relief, I think it a duty I owe to myself, to my country, and to his Majesty's minister, to come forward on this particular occasion with a plain statement of facts, which it is imagined are incontrovertible, and notwithstanding, however, ineffectual the application of an individual may ultimately prove, the facts themselve a must shew the absolute necessity there is

for a very considerable reduction of the duties on rum, or an additional duty on .

other spirits, and the importance of a full

investigation of this subject, which it is .

hoped may be taken up anew, and, that in a very serious manner by his Majesty's minister.—The charges and deductions on rum, per gallon, to which the planter is subjected, after completing the work of distillation, (exclusive of the capital which he has engaged, and the annual contingencies thereon, which are now enormous) amount

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fully to what it will now sell for at the Bri. tish-market.—The British-merchait can attest, that with a great many of the planters, the nett proceeds of their sugar and rum, since the late excessive duties have taken place, scarcely pay the amount of annual necessary supplies sent from England, exclusive of what must also be had in Jamaica, consequently many of them are daily sinking their capital, and are now driven to extreme distress, neither able to pay debts, interest, or even obtain a scanty support from their property. I am impelled to stand forward as an individual, having myself at this time about one hundred puncheons of prime rum bonded at Leith, where the port charges are very moderate and the market in general not inferior to any in this country.—This rum was insured at 20 l. sterling per puncheon by my merchants, Messrs. Wm. Sibbald. and Co. who considered that sum to be only a reasonable value under the various high contingencies upon the estate, and it now appears, from the merchant's letter, which I have ready to produce, that the rum will not sell for the duty and expense from the distillery, which are nearly as follows, viz. Customs and excise per gallon fo 11 1 Freight - - - - - - - 0 1 0 Insurance - - - - - - - 4. Cooperage, land charges, and

cellar rent - - - - O O 14 Commissions - - - - - - -O O 2 O 12 9

Puncheons, for which no allow

ance is made in Britain, wain

age, wharfage, storage, cooperage, &c. - - - - - - O J O Wastage and interest - - - - O O 9

* {O 14 6 I think there is also an island duty. In

addition to these calculations there are ca... sualties, viz. First : That a loss often happens which does not amount to a sum recoverable against the underwriters, on an

* Revisal of calculations comprehending duties imposed since the above calculations were made.——In making a fair statement of the present duties, charges, and evident losses on rum, per gallon, after the work of distillation is complete, you must calculate upon a given surn to the planter, as a part of the expected return for his immense capital, and his present very high annual contingencies, say 201. for every 110 gallons, which is conmonly considered as being rather under the average quantity contained

* - " - - -

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in a puncheon when it is sent from the

estate full proof.
The late duty per gallon - -
Add new duty 12; per cent. on
the above - - - - - - O
War freight per gallon - - - O
Do. insurance, about - - - O
O

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Cooperage, landing charges, and cellar rent, about - - - Insurance against fire when bonded, and subject to all charges, about - - - Brokerage in London, do. - Commissions on gross sales 2} per cent. subject to the duty, being paid by the purchaser, about - - - - - - Puncheons, for which no allowance is made in Britain, wainage, what fage, storage, cooperage, &c. upon a moderate calculation of average, from the still to the shipment, which the planter must pay in Jamaica - - - - - - O 1 0 Common wastage from the estate to the landing in Britain, and loss of interest to the planter, who must pay the merchant interest for his comanon advances, exclusive of (oans, till he receives the nett proceeds, if any there be, at least - - - - - - - - O O 9 Sundry casualties, as mentioned in my letter, No. 1, exclusive of these calculations, at least o 1, 6

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The duty and cbarges, &c. per * gallon from the still only to the period of sale, when bonded, is at least - - - , f'O 16 6 100 puncheons of rum of 100 gallons eacb, at 10s. 6d. per gallon, to which the planter may be subjected before he obtains a sale for his rum, after completing the work of distiliation, is 8,250l.——From this sum of 8,250l. for duties and charges, government receives for duties only 6,250l. —The charges from the still to the British market is 2,000l.--—Credit by late sales at Liverpool, subject to the payment of duty only from 1s, to 1s. 6d. per gallon Jagmaica rum, - *

duty and all other charges, except the commission, remain the same. Thirdly : That the rum being bonded, in the hope of obtaining a saving price, there is a further loss of wastage, storage, interest, and the duties which are charged upon the full quantity first lodged in the King's stores, though that quantity is frequently very considerably reduced before it is sold ; and if the bond has expired before the sale, or when regauged, it becomes a heavy loss upon the planter. Insurance against fire, &c. during that time ought also to be calculated. Fourthly: When the rum is above hydrometer, proof it pays 10s. 4; d. per gallon duty for every gallon of strength over proof, and though under proof from causes before mentioned, yet it pays full duty. Fifthly: British spirits, say “good whiskey, at “strength 10 per cent. under hydrometer “ proof, sells now at 6s. per gallon, which “clearly proves that the duty, &c. on Bri“tish spirits bear no proportion to that on “rum.” How the British distillers can afford to sell at this price may be a matter of surprise, but such is the fact, that they do sell for about one-third of what rum can be sold at, upon a fair calculation.—I

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as his Majesty's minister consd never have' meant that such an injustice should have been introduced into his system of finance, and upon that ground I am clearly of opinion, that the planter's real situation in many respects has either been misrepresented, or not clearly stated to his Majesty's minister, because the ruinous inference to be drawn from these plain facts are too obvious to be erased.—To these grievances allow me to add the losses to which the planter is subjected by frequent decrease of negroes and cattle, from complaints incident to the island, and by various other casualties, the wasteful visitation of hurricanes, &c. &c. Then let it be inquired how the planter can possibly maintain his credit, or carry on the culture of his estate. If, instead of paying the charges of his estate by nett proceeds on his rum, which is always calculated upon, he is brought in debt by the sales of this article after it arrives in Britain, is it any wonder that the planter should find himself deeply aggrieved Burdened with excessive duties, which actually precludes him not only from profit, but from the means of keeping up his estate without waste; pressed by his creditors for advances on which many cannot pay the interest, Consequently refused new loans, though his interest is actually nearly connected with that of the British merchants, who amongst other things are justly alarmed by the example of independence in a neighbouring island. How hard is his situation? Frightful as this picture of the planter's situation may appear (though I admit of exceptions amongst the very wealthy) it is a faithful one, and unless their grievances meets with some effectual redress, the consequence must appear to the least discerning eye, ruinous to the colonies and highly injurious to the real interests of this country.——There is an ultimate point, beyond which nothing can be carried, and it is absolutely necessary that the planter, after so much patience and long sufferings, should now claim redress from the load under which he at present groans, and that in the most unequivocal manner; justice, sound policy, and the real interest of Great Britain, call aloud for the ear of his Majesty's minister; and if that should be with-held, necessity will compel the planter to seek for some new mode of relief, in which case I think it incumbent upon me to point out a measure which may necessarily ensue; a measure which T earnestly pray that the attention of his Majesty's minister, and lenity of the British merchant, may prevent. Were unanimity to prevail, the planters might determine not

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