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was close by M. d’Avary's. On leaving him

he renewed his assurances of the respect and devotion he entertained for the person of the King and his august family; and it was agreed that the Count d'Avaray should transmit to M. de Hoym such ultimate details as might appear necessary to enable bitn to discover the criminals. The Marquis of Bonnay, an officer of the gardes du corps, honoured with the King's confidence, and intrusted with his correspondence, was employed by M. d’Avaray to transmit to M. de Hoym the particulars requested. To supply as much as possible the want of the seal of the Count de Hoym, the Count d'Avaray went to the house of the Archbishop of Rheims, who had been previou ly informed of the affair, and requested him to affix his seal, which he did.—The King had fixed his departure for the next day, and the Count d'Avaray thought it time to intorm his Majesty of the whole affair, that he might act in future by his orders. The King discovered on this occasion a warm solicitude for his family and faithful serwants; but in respect to himself the same serenity he has discovered on every similar occasion. His Majesty wrote to the President de Hoym the following letter: “Sir, “ —I have received information of a plot “ entertained against my life. If none but “ myself were aimed at, if mortal weapons “ were the means, accustomed as you know “ me to be to such threats, I would pay “ them little attention ; but my wife, my “ nephew, my niece, my faithful servan's, “ are likewise threatened with poison, and “I should betray my most sacred duties it “ I despised this danger. Perhaps I am “beset with ruffians; perhaps it is only a “ base imposition. In either case I find it necessary to co fer with you. I beg of “ you to come this evening, when I shall “ have the additional satisfaction of assuring

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“ you, &c.” The Count d'Avaray did not find M. de Hoym at home, and had not an opportunity of giving him the King's letters, till nine o'clock at night. M. de Hoym replied verbally, that he should have the honour to send an answer to M. the Count de l'Isle, and that the next day he would attend his commands. He added, that every thing was in the hands of the police, and should be followed up with acti. vity. M. d’Avaray expressed his surprise that Coulon had not yet been apprehended, whose tour was perfectly well known, as it was important that he should be strictly examined, whether his declaration was true, or whether he was an impostor. The 23d July, the day fixed for the departure of the King, arrived. No answer from M. de Hoym having been received by his Majesty, he was obliged to postpone his journey, and charged the Count d'Avaray, to communicate the affair to M. the Duke d'Angouleme, requesting him not to apprise Madaine. The Count d'Avaray gave a detailed account of the affair to the Duke d’Angouleme in presence of the Count de la Chapelle, whom the King was to leave at Warsaw, charged with special powers for the fur, her investigation of this affair.— The Count d'Avaray transmitted to M. de Hoym the supplementary declaration made by Coulon, on the 24th in the evening-The answer of M. de Hoym arrived on the morning of the 25th. It stated “ that the “ natire of his duties did not permit him to “ perform more than a merely passive part “ in such an affair, and that he had given “ the police the necessary instructions."— The King having no longer any hope of

seeing M. de Hoym, and of communicating

verbally with him, thought it time to make a demand in form, which he did in the following terms : “The Count de l'Isle has re“ ceived the answer of the President de “ Hoym. to his letter of the 24th of July, in “ which he promised to wait on him. He “ relies too much on the friendly solicitude “ of his Prussian Majesty towards him and “ his family, and on the sentiments of personal attachment of which the President “ de Hoym has given so many proofs, not “ to be convinced of the activity with which “ those measures will be carried into execu“ tion, that were ordered in consequence of “ the declaration made by the person called “ Coulou. The Count de l'Isle had expect“ed that the President de Hoym would “ have come on his invitation, but finding “ from his letter that he would not come to “ Lazinky, he finds it necessary to make he “following demands: 1. That the person

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called Coulon, along with his wife, be se“ cured, in order that they may not effect “ their escape; and that they may undergo, “ as soon as possible, the necessary exami“ nation. 2. That there be immediately * nominated professional men to assist and “ co-operate with the Physician of the Count de l'Isle, in analyzing the articles “ considered as suspicious, and given up by “ Coulon. —M. the Count de l'Isle hope “ that the President de Hoym will have no “ objection to give him immediate satisfaction in those several respects. Whatever “ may be the result of those measures, the “ Count de l'Isle relies with confidence on the exertions of the President de Hoym, for “ the safety of those dear and precious ob“jects which he leaves here under the pro“tection of his Prussian Majesty." The Duke de Pienne, charged by his Majesty to carry this to M. de Hoym, returned with the answer, “ that the police was apprized of “ the whole affair, and that it would do its “ duty." This might be satisfactory in regard to Coulon, but was by no means an answer to the demand made of professional people to analyze the articles in question. It was now six in the evening, and the King's note had been sent at two in the afternoon. Notwithstanding the danger of a delay, which might alter the nature of the articles contained in the packet, the King was under the necessity of waiting till next day for the answer of the government.—During this interval Count d'Avaray charged M. de Faivre, the King's physician, to procure the assistance of two physicians and an apothecary to make an analysis of the articles delivered by Coulon.——On the 26th, at eight in the morning, the King received an answer from M. de Hoym. It stated, “ that “ the nomination of a commission for the analysis demanded, depended neither on “ him nor the police; that it could only “ take place subsequently to a criminal pro“ cess already begun; that the person of * Coulon could not be secured, because the “laws of the realm did not permit his im“ prisonment so long as he was not charged “ with any crime.” Without losing a moment, the Count d'Avaray, accompanied by the Duke de Pienne and the King's physician, went to Dr. Gagatkiewicz, one of the most distinguished physicians at Warsaw for his skill and moral character. There, in presence of Dr. Bergenzoni and M. Gudeit, apothecary, the Count d'Avaray broke open the seals affixed to the packet by him and the Archbishop of Rheins, took out one of the three carrots and submitted it to the medical men present. The opening made at

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one of the extremities was pasted over with a clammy substance, of a colour nearly resembling that of the vegetable. M. Gudeit opened it. When they had finished their chemical operations, they drew up a procès verbal, and delivered, in the mean-time to M. d’Avaray the following attestation: “After several chemical experiments made “ on the mass found in the inside of a carrot “ which was delivered to us, it appears be“yond a doubt that this mass is a poison of “ arsenic, consisting of a mixture of three “ sorts of arsenic – white, yellow, and red, “ as shall be afterwards more particularly “stated." Signed, Valentine Gagatkiewiez, doctor in medicine.—Gudeit, apothecary. “ Doctor Bergenzoni being obliged to attend a very pressing engagement, only signed the procès verbal." Dated IWarsaw, July the 26th, 1804.—The bottle delivered to Coulon by the two strangers, only contained a spirituous liquor. The carrot on which the experiment had been made, was returned into the packet, and again sealed with the seal of the Duke de Pienne, with that of the Count d'Avaray, and those of the professional men present.—The same precaution was observed with respect to the other two untouched carrots and the bottle of spirits. – Furnished with the certificate of the medical men respecting the existence and nature of the poison, the King addressed the following note to the President de Tilly, chief of the special Police of the City, to whom M. de Hoym, alleging his incompetency, had recommended the affair.—— “M. the Count de l'Isle was obliged, ac“cording to the forms pointed out to him, “ and which he has hitherto constantly fol“ lowed, to address the President de Hoym “ as Chief of the Province, for the prosecu“tion of the attempt denounced by the said “ Coulon. But M. the President de Hoym, “ by his letter of the 23d, received this “ morning, having declared himself incom“ petent to judge of this affair, and that the

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“ business belongs to the Special Police of

“ the City, M. the Count de l'Isle addresses “ with the same confidence the President “ de Tilly. He consequently directed the “Count d'Avaray to put into his hands a “ packet containing the articles hitherto “ considered as suspicious; but which the “ report made and signed this day by the “ medical men (which report the Count “ d'Avaray is also charged to deliver to him) “ really proves to be infected with poison. “Besides this man Coulon, in consequence “ of the threats he says were made to him, “ twinking his life continually exposed, M. “ the Count de l'Isle, without allowing him“self to give his personal opinion as to the “truth of the information given by him, “thinks himself bound to place him spe“cially under the protection and safeguard “ of the police and of the law. M. the “Count de l'Isle has always had too much reason to be satisfied with the conduct of “M, the President de Tilly, to doubt his activity in following up this at fair in such “a manner as to detect the guity. He seizes with pleasure this opportunity of “ assuring M. the President de Tilly of the respect he entertains for him." —M. de Tilly was not to be found on the 26th. The King's note and the packet containing the report of the professional men, and the substantial proof of the crime, did not reach him till the 27th.-In the evening M. de Tilly returned an answer, acknowledging the receipt of the King's note and the letter of M. d'Avaray. He stated, “.. that in quality of “Chief of the Police he kept the packet put “ into his hands in order to be delivered as farther orders might be given. Put that he could not on any account proceed against those who were supposed guilty of the affair in question; since it is solely within the sphere of justice that the eximination of every thing connected with it “ can now be referred.” Hitherto M. d'Avaray had thought it proper to avoid all direct communication with Coulon, in or . der to leave to the police the commencement of the measures to be taken respecting him. The magistrate having taken up the affair, and Coulon remaining at large in Warsaw, M. d Avaray was of opinion that it

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was his right and dory to examine him him

self. He sent for him to the house of M. de Moll ville, on the 27th July, and in his presence, and that of the Duke de Pietone, Coulon narrated all that had passed. The Count d'Avaray put questions to ensnare him; affected to allude to important circumstances with which he (the Count) was acquainted, and which Coulon did not reveal. Coulon did not vary in his declarations, was firin in all his assertions, was decided upon scrime circumstances which at first had appeare doubtful. The Count d'Avaray requested Coulon not to give way to his apprehensions and not quit the town, assuring him that she King had placed him uuder the protection of the police and the law. The following day, the 28, si, Coulon underwent a new examination, and his answers were such, that the persons to whom they were communicated, convinced of the truth of his information, have added their signatures to that of M. the Count d'Avaray. (Signed) The Count d'Avaray. Alex.

August, Archbishop Duke of Rheims. The Duke de Pienne. The Marquis de Bonnay. The Count de la Chapelle. The Duke de Havre et de Croy. The Abbey Edgworth de Fermont. The Count de D imas Crux, Court Stephen de Damas, One essential circumstance which we have omitted is contained in the posterior declaration made by Coulon on the 25th, in the morning, and it is this.--That at one in the moraing, the strangers opened the out r door of Coulon's house with a picklock, as he thinks, and attempted to pick the door at the foot of the staircase, but without success, as the key was in the inside and Coulon holding it. He heard some one say, “the stroke has failed, “we must instantly apprise Boyer and set “ off." Another said, “Do you ste! had “we but given money." - They then talked together, but lower, and Coulou could not hear what they said. — Description of the . two men : – Five feet one inch (French), full person, large nose, black tyrs, black liair, cropped, mouth in dolling, lish b vie cravat, great coat, iron grey butto is of the same, fancy waistcoat woh violet stripes, nankeeen pantaloons, white s'is “o kings, and sharp pointed shoes. – Toe o 'oet five feet four inches (French), complexio townish, light eye-brows, boa, k -yes, "are long and thin, smail nose, blue cra, at with white spots, blue coat with velvet collar, two fancy waistcoats, nankeen pantatoons, and . boots.

Letter, written by the Duke D'Enghien, a short time before his death, to the Britis! Minister at Poienna. S1 to, --General Ecquevil’y having informed me of the very great witinguess with which you took upon yourself the office of . making known to your government my desire to be employed in the course of the present war, a d of the kind manner which you evinced with respect to me, I could not delay returning you my sincere thanks, and cxpressing to you bow deeply sensible I am . of the interest you have taken in my behalf. . I repeat with toll confidence, Sir, what Ge-, neral Ecquevilly no doubt has communicated to yon from me. The absolute nullity . in which I vegetate, whilst the path of honour is open to so many others, becomes , every day more insupportable. I wish only to give your generous government proofs of my gratitude and my zeal. I date hope that the English will deem me worthy of conubating, by their side, our implacable ene- . mies, and will permit me to share their periis and part of their glory. Entirely devoid of all private interest relative to my

cause, my request has no other object than some rank in your army, or an honourable commission. It differs too much from that which has been made by the members of my family, resident in England, not to induce

me to entertain a hope of obtaining a hap

pier result. You will infinitely oblige nie, Sir, by dwelling strongly upon this differ. ence. Undoubtedly it is our sacred duty to serve till death our legitimate sovereign, and our cause ; but it is also a dear and pressing duty to me to serve my benefactors, and to prove that my gratitude is as deep as it is disinterested. This desire, which my heart has long felt, becomes more ardent every day. Do me, therefore, the favour, Sir, to acquaint me confidentially with tke means you may think the most likely to obtain this end, and be assured of all my gratitude, as well as my particular ester m and my distinguished consideraticn.— L. A. H. De Bo U R B o N, Duc d'Es G H EN. Etown#eim, Electorate of Baden, Feb. 15, 1804. EMPEROR OF THE FR EN CFI. Organic Senatus Consultan, conferring the Title of Emperor on the First Consul, and establishing the Imperial Dignity creditary in his Family. (Concluded from p. 21.1.) CXII. Denunciations by the legislative body can only be delayed, at the demand of the tribunate, or the requisition of fifty members of the legislative body.— CXIV. In both cases the demand and requisition must be delivered in writing, and signed by the president and secretaries of the tribunate, or by ten members of the legislative body. If the charge is against a minister or counsellor of state, it is communicated to him at the expiration of one month. – CXV. The denounced minister or counsellor of state is not to appear in person for the purpose of answering the charges against him. The £aperor nominates three counsellors of state, who appear before the legislative body on the day appointed, and learn the particulars of the denunciation.— CXVI. The legislative body in a secret coin. mittee, discusses the facts contained in the demand or requisition, and decides on thern by ballot.—CXVII. The act of deutlinciation must be circumstantial and signed by the president and secretaries of the legislative body. It is transmitted to the arch. chancellor of the empire, who forwards it to the attorney-general of the high imperial court —CXVIII. Cases of delinquency or abose of power in captains-general of colonies, co

lonial prefects, governors of establishments

bryond sea, in acts of disobedience on the

Part of ge::crals or admirals, and of pecula

tion' on the part of prefects, are also denounced by ministers. If the denunciation is by the grand judge, minister of justice, he can take no part in the decisions on the said denunciation.—CXIX. In the cases determined by articles CX. CXI. CXII. and CXVIII, the attorney-general acquaints, within three days, the arch-chancellor of the empire, that it is necessary to assemble the high imperial court. The arch-chancellor, having received his orders from the emperor, appoints some period within eight days for opening the sittings.--CXX. At the first sitting of the high imperial court it determines its competency to cnter upon the case before it.--CXXI. In cases of denunciation or complaint, the attorney-general, assisted

by the tribunes and the three magistrates at

the bar, examine whether there is due ground to proceed. . The decision is with the attorney general. One of the magistrates at the bar, may be appointed by the attorney general to conduct the proceedings. If the public ministry determines that the charge, complaint, or denunciation ought not to be

received, it moves certain resolutions to be .

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Provided the commissaries determine that the complainant ought not to proceed with the accusation, the case is referred to the high imperial court, which pronounces a definitive judgment thereon.—CXXVII. The high imperial court cannot come to a decision unless sixty members are present. Ten out of the sixty may be challenged by

the party accused, and ten by the accusing

party. The judgment of the court is determined by the inajority of votes.—CXXVIII. The discussions on these occasions are open to the public.—CXXIX. Perso, s accused may employ advocates. If they are unprovided, the arch-chancellor of the empire appoints them one gratis.-CXXX. The high imperial court can only decide in cases which come within the penal code.—— CXXXI. In cases of acquittal, the high imperial court places the person acquitted under the protection of the high police of the sate, for the time it may deem proper. —CXXXII. No appeal can be made against the decision of the high imperial court. TITLE x Iv. of T H E J U Dict A L or D ER. CXXXIV. The decisions of the courts of justice are intifuled arrots.-CXXXV. The presidents of the court of cassation, the court of appeal, and of criminal justice, are nominated for life by the emperor, and may be chosen out of the courts in which they preside.—CXXXVI. The tribunal of cassation takes the title of the court of cassation. The tribunals of appeal take the title of court of appeal, and the criminal tribunals that of court of criminal justice. The president of the court of cassation, and also the president of the courts of appeal divided into sections, take the title of first president: the vi e presidents that of pre sident. The commissaries of government in the court of cassation, the courts of appeal, and the courts of criminal justice, take the title of imperial attorneys general. Trt LE X v. of, P Rom U LG At Ion. CXXXVII. The emperor causes ever organic senatus consultum, senatus ... turn, act of the senate and law, to be sealed and promulgated. Organic senatus consulta, senatus consulta, and acts of the senate are promulgated within the ten days subsequent to their adoption.--CXXXVIII. Two copies are taken of each of the acts mentioned in the preceding article. Both •copies are signed by the emperor, examined by the titularies of the grand dignities, counter-signed by the secretary of state and the minister of justice, and sealed with the great seal of the skate.-CXXXIX. One

copy is deposited in the archives of the great seal; the othe in the archives of the

public authority whence the act originated.

CXL. The promulgation is in the following terms: “ N. (the surname of the enaeror), by the grace of God and the constitutions of the republic, emperor of the French, to all present and absent, greeting: the senate after hearing the orators of the council of state, has decreed and ordered as follows:” ———(or/rovided it is a new law} “ the legislative body on the (the date) have issued the following decree, conformably to the proposition made in the name of the emperor, and after having heard the orators of the council of state and the sections of the tribunate : we hereby command that the present, sealed with the sea! of the state and inserted in the bulletins of the laws, be addressed to the courts, tribunals and administrative authori ies, to be inscribed in their registers, and duly observed and executed. The grand judge, minister of justice, shall watch over the execution of the same.

o TITLE x v I AND 1. A ST.

CLI. The following proposition shall be presented for the acceptance of the people, according to the forms determi, ed by the decree of the 20th Floreal, year 16. “The people wills the imperial dignity to be hereditary in the direct, natural, legitimate, and adopted descent of Napoleon Buonaparté, and in the direct, natural, and legitimate descent of Joseph and of Louis Buonaparté, as regulated by the organic senatus consultum of the 28th Floreal, year 12. Signed, CA MBA céR Es, second consul, president, Morand de Galles, Joseph Cornudet, secretaries. It is our will and pleasure that the present, sealed with the seal of the state, and inserted in the bulletin of the laws, be addressed to the respective courts, tribunals, and administrative authorities, to be inscribed in their registers, and duly observed and executed. The grand judge, minister of justice, is charged to watch over the execution of the same. (Signed) NApolo on. By the emperor, (signed) H. B. MA Ret. Examined by us, arch-chancellor of the empire, (signed) CA Mr. A céR Es. The grand judge, minister of justice, (signed) REGN ER.

PUBLIC PAPERS. Admiral Gantheaume, Counsellor of State, Grand Officer of one of the Cohorts of the Legion of Honour, Commandant of the 1mtrial Naval Army of the Ocean, to his Excellency the Minister of the Marine and Colonies.——On board the Pangeur, in the

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