The Croppy, a tale, by the authors of 'The O'Hara tales' [really M. Banim alone].

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Page 153 - ... or give evidence against, any member or members of this or similar societies for any act or expression of theirs, done or made collectively or individually in or out of this society, in pursuance of the spirit of this obligation.
Page 204 - Ballybreehoone cavalry. With much ostentation, his instrument of torture was flourished round his head, and though at every lash the shrieks of the sufferer came loud, the lashes themselves were scarce less distinct. A second group challenged the eye. Shawna-Gow's house stood alone in the village.
Page 204 - ... redly in the glow, as, at a command from their captain, they sent up the hill-side three shouts over the demolition of the Croppy's dwelling. But still, though his breast heaved, and though wreaths...
Page 153 - In the awful presence of God, I, AB, do voluntarily declare, that I will persevere in endeavouring to form a brotherhood of affection among Irishmen of every religious persuasion, and that I will also persevere in my endeavours to obtain an equal, full, and adequate representation of all the people of Ireland.
Page 285 - Upon its top was hoisted a rude flag of sun-faded green, on which, in clumsy white letters, had been inscribed "Liberty or Death." Had the breeze been brisk enough to float the banner to its full extent such were the words that would have met the eye. But the...
Page 299 - But we paint from the people of a land, amongst whom, for the last six hundred years, national provocations have never ceased to keep alive the strongest, and often the worst passions of our nature ; whose pauses, — during that long lapse of a country's existence, — from actual conflict in the field, have been but so many changes into mental strife ; and who, to this day, are held prepared, should the war-cry be given, to rush at each other's...
Page 7 - Orangeman ; by skilful management, in able hands, the badge of that party became a necessary symbol of loyalty ; few of the established religion, therefore, from motives of choice or of prudence, as the case might be, appeared abroad without it. The Catholic peasant confounded all the late adherents of his abhorred enemies with the first and worst who had persecuted him ; Protestant and Orangeman became, in his mind, synonymous words ; and in this delusion he caught up his rude and formidable pike,...
Page 286 - ... fail of its enlivening effect. And leaders appeared, with green ribands, or perhaps a military sash around their persons, or epaulettes on their shoulders, torn from officers they had slain. These were busy inspecting different bands of insurgents as they practised their pike exercise ; now driving forward the weapon at a given object ; now darting it over their shoulders as if to meet a foe from behind ; now adroitly grasping it at either end with both hands...
Page 285 - ... his rude spit, still holding the morsel on its point, to some member of his family, or voraciously devoured it himself. Even here, amongst these houseless and friendless people — none, we would add, of the ferocious garrison of the windmill prison, but rather some poor wanderers from a burnt cabin, recently come in — even amongst these, surrounded by sights of horror, and stifling their hunger in this almost savage manner, national characteristics were not beaten down. The...
Page 285 - became hidden, and "Death" alone was visible. His banner it might indeed well appear to be — drooping, in appropriate listlessness, as it flaunted the name of the destroyer above the havoc he had made. For, just below the base of the tower the rocks and the burned grass were reddened, and lifeless bodies, frightfully gashed, lay here and there, some fully to be seen, others partly concealed by the stunted furze and shrubs. Sir William still toiled upward. In different places along the hill-side,...

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