The Parliamentary Register: Or an Impartial Report of the Debates that Have Occured in the Two Houses of Parliament, Volume 1

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Page 409 - I believe that the origin of the purchase and sale of commissions arises pretty much as follows : In every other service in Europe, it is understood that the Head of the army has the power of granting pensions to the officers of the army, in proportion to their rank and services ; no such power exists in the Head of the army in this country ; therefore when an officer is arrived at the command of a regiment, and is, from long service, infirmity, or wounds, totally incapable of proceeding -with that...
Page 595 - House, appointed to investigate the Conduct of His Royal Highness the Duke of York, the Commander-in-Chief, with regard to Promotions, Exchanges and Appointments to Commissions in the Army and Staff of the Army, and in raising Levies for the Army...
Page 435 - News, my angel, you cannot expect from me from hence ; though the life led here, at least in the family I am in, is very hurrying, there is a sameness in it which affords little subject for a letter ; except lord Chesterfield's family, there is not a person except ourselves that I know.
Page 3 - Gentlemen of the House of Commons, " We are commanded by his Majesty to inform you, that he has directed the estimates of the current year to be laid before you.
Page 515 - I have no stock for the voyage, neither have I any money to purchase those little things which are absolutely necessary. I have to keep watch four hours every night, and have nothing to eat but salt meat three times a week, and water to drink, the rum being so bad, 'tis impossible to drink it.
Page 515 - tis impossible to drink it. " Your goodness to me has ever been such as leaves not the smallest doubt that you will not suffer me to starve in the situation you have been pleased to place me, and which is such as will ever tend to make me the most grateful and happy of beings. " Should, Madam, you be induced to take into consideration my wretched case, and by a little pecuniary aid save...
Page 409 - The bearing that this has upon the army is a very extensive question, but there can be no doubt that it is extremely advantageous for those officers who cannot purchase." I cannot better illustrate it to the Committee, than by stating an example...
Page 173 - Ncvi-r, she replied. She had, indeed, written to Mr William Adam, who was then present, and heard her evidence, telling him, that if he did not fulfil his promises and the duke's, by paying her the annuity for which he was guarantee, and which he had promised her should be regularly paid, she should be necessitated to expose his Royal...
Page 126 - The honourable gentleman asked, what were ministers and the law officers doing, or why they did not institute prosecutions? The fact is, they have instituted prosecutions; but their entire time would be taken up in prosecuting the libellers of the duke of York, if every libel was to be prosecuted. There was also one reason which often prevented prosecution. It...
Page 341 - I am continually worried by Colonel French — he worries me continually about the levy business, and is always wanting something more in his own favour.

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