The History of the United States of America, Volume 3

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Contents

Blockade of Boston Massachusetts Army
73
Capture of Ticonderoga Crown Point and St Johns
81
Bills of Credit Declaration of the causes of taking up Arms
87
New Hampshire Flight of Wentworth
98
Camp before Boston Reenlistment of the Army
107
The British in Boston
113
CHAPTER XXXIII
121
Hesitation of Pennsylvania and New Jersey
125
Commercial Regulations Agent sent to France
131
Ratified by New York Pennsylvania Convention
137
Affairs of the Northern Department 143
143
Camp on Harlem Heights Nathan Hale
150
Sittings of the New York Convention
156
CHAPTER XXXV
163
Washington retires to Morristown
169
Cavalry Pickering Adjutant General
173
Commissioners to other Courts
180
CHAPTER XXXVI
186
Foreign Officers Jealousy as to Rank
192
Proclamations Affairs of Vermont
200
Stark the Militia in Burgoynes Rear
208
Capitulation of Burgoyne
214
A second Battle prevented Wayne surprised
220
Defense of Red Bank
225
Distress of the Army
231
Detention of Burgoynes Army
237
Small Success of the British Loyalist Corps
243
Foraging Parties Washingtons Army
248
The British Commission Johnstones Overtures to Reed
254
Troubles from the Western Indians Clarkes Expedition
260
Articles of Confederation Jay President of Congress
266
His Address and Paines Reply
268
Reorganization of the American Army
274
Danger of Charleston Neutrality proposed
280
Kings Ferry on the Hudson occupied by the British
281
Expeditions into the Country of the Six Nations
287
Repulse at Savannah
293
Issue of Paper stopped Bills of Exchange Expenditures
299
Clintons Expedition against South Carolina
304
Nelson Governor Complaints against Jefferson Dictator
357
March to the Southward
363
STATE CONSTITUTIONS THE CONFEDERATION WEST
374
Forms of Judicial Proceedings Law Reports
380
Descent of landed Property
387
Redemptioners
395
The Continental Congress
401
Heads of Departments Finance
404
Western SettlementsPennsylvania Law of Treason
410
Shelburne Prime Minister his Views
416
Communicated to Vergenneshis Conduct toward America
420
Second Newburgh Letter Meeting of the Officers
432
Question of the Residence of Congress
438
Carleton refuses to surrender the Negro Refugees
440
Paper Money Issues Continental and State
446
Resignation of Morris Livingston and Lincoln
453
Difficulties with Great Britain
455
Treaties with the Southwestern Indians and the Shawanese
461
Symptoms of Disruption
468
Troops raised by Congress
474
FORMATION OF THE FEDERAL CONSTITUTION Page
482
Second Branch of the national Legislature Term of Service
488
The national Plan reported back to the House
494
Last Effort for a proportional second Branch
501
Delegates from New Hampshire take their Seats
503
Regulation of Commerce Slave Trade
509
The three Compromises of the Constitution
519
Objections of Mason Randolph and Gerry
525
Estimate for 1787 fourteenth Requisition
530
By New Jersey Georgia and Connecticut Governors
536
Application of Kentucky referred to the new Government
543
AUTHORITIES
550
Catholic Church in the United States 479
563
INDEX
565
Continental Congress meets
570
The British driven from Boston
577
Methodist Episcopal Church Baptists 480
578
Treasury Continental Fleet
584

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Page 50 - There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it : I have killed many : I have fully glutted my vengeance. For my country I rejoice at the beams of peace. But do not harbor a thought that mine is the joy of fear.
Page 87 - In our own native land, in defence of the freedom that is our birth-right, and which we ever enjoyed till the late violation of it; for the protection of our property, acquired solely by the honest industry of our forefathers and ourselves, against violence actually offered, we have taken up arms. We shall lay them down when hostilities shall cease on the part of the aggressors, and all danger of their being renewed shall be removed, and not before.
Page 123 - That it be recommended to the provincial convention of New Hampshire to call a full and free representation of the people, and that the representatives, if they think it necessary, establish such a form of government as, in their judgment, will best produce the happiness of the people, and most effectually secure peace and good order in the province, during the continuance of the present dispute between Great Britain and the colonies.
Page 47 - This assembly is like no other that ever existed. Every man in it is a great man, an orator, a critic, a statesman; and therefore every man upon every question must show his oratory, his criticism, and his political abilities. The consequence of this is that business is drawn and spun out to an immeasurable length.
Page 510 - Religion and humanity had nothing to do with this question. Interest alone is the governing principle with nations. The true question at present is, whether the Southern States shall or shall not be parties to the Union.
Page 511 - Slavery discourages arts and manufactures. The poor despise labor when performed by slaves. They prevent the immigration of whites, who really enrich and strengthen a country. They produce the most pernicious effect on manners. Every master of slaves is born a petty tyrant. They bring the judgment of Heaven on a country.
Page 389 - The whole commerce between master and slave is a perpetual exercise of the most boisterous passions; the most unremitting despotism on the one part, and degrading submission on the other.
Page 506 - The admission of slaves was a most grating circumstance to his mind and he believed would be so to a great part of the people of America. He had not made a strenuous opposition to it heretofore, because he had hoped that this concession...
Page 513 - Mr. GERRY thought we had nothing to do with the conduct of the States as to slaves, but ought to be careful not to give any sanction to it Mr.
Page 483 - The evils we experience flow from the excess of democracy. The people do not want virtue, but are the dupes of pretended patriots.

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