Page images
PDF
EPUB

gry, are most unfeelingly mangled by those whose mouths they fill. Their heads and toes are both cut off'; they are deprived of their extremities; they are curtailed of their fair proportions; they are cheated of feature.

8. In their extremity, as they are very mealymouthed, they merely say, “ Po! po! gentlemen and ladies, spare us a head, and you may bruise our toes, in welcome.” Still, their toes are hacked off, and sometimes

only think!

- tur is stuck on as a substitute ; and thus, you see, those portly, goodlooking, round-faced personages, Potatoes, are sent out into this breathing world, without head or toes, to dig their own Taturs.

9. If it would not weary your patience, we would bring forward the complaints of many others, who are also in a state of suffering.

10. We must not, however, omit to bring to your notice the complaints of a very respectable class of our associates.

11. Every operative, and all who are actively employed, are doomed to go hurrying, and bustling, and dodging about, with one of their extremities hacked off.

12. They are so modest, that they forbear to come forward and present their grievances, believin, as they do, that nothin can be done so long as the indomitable Jack Downing is goin about, talkin, speakin, and doin as he pleases.

13. Please lend us your indulgence a few moments longer. Your supplicants find it difficult to speak of this Downing family with any degree of calmness.

14. They torture us into such unnatural shapes, that the stretchings and disjointings in the Inquisition would be a pleasure in comparison. They make short long, and long short, without mercy. 15. Therefore we beg, in behalf of sound learning and ourselves, that all the members of the Downing family may be sought out by the ought-to-be-enlightened people of the United States, and hurled into that nothin-ness from whence they sprung.

16. Now, sovereign arbiters, shall the condition of our suffering brethren be ameliorated ? Shall the era of good grammar, correct spelling, and proper pronunciation, be hastened forward by some benevolent exertions ?

17. Shall the present abuses be transmitted to the future, or not? Shall the Golden Age of Speech speedily come, and last evermore?

18. That some improvements in our condition, and in the condition of our afflicted brethren, may be vouchsafed, is the humble prayer of your supplicants; all whose names, being too numerous to be here subscribed, may be found recorded in Webster's great dictionary

THE HYACINTH.

Over the moorland, over the lea,
Dancing airily, there are we;
Sometimes, mounted on stems aloft,

We wave o'er broom and heather,
To meet the kiss of the zephyr soft;

Sometimes, close together,
Tired of dancing, tired of peeping,
Under the whin you'll find us sleeping.
Daintily bend we our honeyed bells,
While the gossiping bee her story tells
Of the wealth to her waxen storehouse gone,
And drowsily hums and murmurs on;
And though she gathers our sweets the

while, We welcome her in with a nod and a smile.

[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors]

and ourselves, that all the members of the Downing family may be sought out by the ought-to-be-enlightened people of the United States, and hurled into that nothin-ness from whence they sprung.

16. Now, sovereign arbiters, shall the condition of our suffering brethren be ameliorated ? Shall the era of good grammar, correct spelling, and proper pronunciation, be hastened forward by some benevolent exertions?

17. Shall the present abuses be transmitted to the future, or not? Shall the Golden Age of Speech speedily come, and last evermore ?

18. That some improvements in our condition, and in the condition of our afflicted brethren, may be vouchsafed, is the humble prayer of your supplicants; all whose names, being too numerous to be here subscribed, may be found recorded in Webster's great dictionary.

THE HYACINTH.

Over the moorland, over the lea,
Dancing airily, there are we;
Sometimes, mounted on stems aloft,

We wave o'er broom and heather,
To meet the kiss of the zephyr soft;

Sometimes, close together,
Tired of dancing, tired of peeping,
Under the whin you'll find us sleeping.
Daintily bend we our honeyed bells,
While the gossiping bee her story tells
Of the wealth to her waxen storehouse gone,
And drowsily hums and murmurs on;
And though she gathers our sweets the

while, We welcome her in with a nod and a smile.

No rock is too high, no vale too low,
For our fragile and tremulous forms to grow.

Sometimes we crown
The castle's dizziest tower, and look

Laughingly down
On the pygmy men in the world below,
Wearily wandering to and fro.
Sometimes we dwell on the cragged crest

Of mountain high ;
And the ruddy sun, from the blue sea's breast,

Climbing the sky,
Looks from his couch of glory up,
And lights the dew in the bluebell's cup.
We are crowning the mountains

With azure bells,
Or decking the fountains

In forest dells,
Or wreathing the ruin with clusters gray,
And nodding and laughing the livelong day,
Then, chiming our lullaby, tired with play.
Are we not beautiful ? O, are not we
The darlings of mountain, and moorland, and

lea ?
Plunge in the forest are we not fair ?
Go to the high road — we'll meet you

there.
O, where is the flower that content may tell,
Like the laughing, and nodding, and dancing

bluebell ?

THE CADI'S DECISIONS.

| HAVING heard that the cadi of one of his twelve tribes administered justice in an admirable manner, and pronounced decisions in a style worthy of King Solomon himself, Bou-Akas determined to judge for himself as to the truth of the report.

« PreviousContinue »