The Gentleman's Magazine, Volume 238

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F. Jefferies, 1875 - Early English newspapers
 

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Page 604 - Hold, hold, my heart ; And you, my sinews, grow not instant old, But bear me stiffly up. Remember thee ! Ay, thou poor ghost, while memory holds a seat In this distracted globe.
Page 355 - But to her heart, her heart was voluble, Paining with eloquence her balmy side; As though a tongueless nightingale should swell Her throat in vain, and die, heart-stifled, in her dell.
Page 458 - He took the suffering human race, He read each wound, each weakness clear; And struck his finger on the place, And said: Thou ailest here, and here!
Page 605 - Tis now the very witching time of night, When churchyards yawn, and hell itself breathes out Contagion to this world : now could I drink hot blood, And do such bitter business as the day Would quake to look on.
Page 183 - Less than arch-angel ruined, and the excess Of glory obscured: as when the sun, new risen, Looks through the horizontal misty air Shorn of his beams; or from behind the moon, In dim eclipse, disastrous twilight sheds On half the nations, and with fear of change Perplexes monarchs.
Page 459 - When Byron's eyes were shut in death, We bow'd our head and held our breath. He taught us little ; but our soul Had felt him like the thunder's roll. With shivering heart the strife we saw Of passion with eternal law ; And yet with reverential awe We watch'd the fount of fiery life Which served for that Titanic strife.
Page 177 - LET the day perish wherein I was born, and the night in which it was said, " There is a man child conceived." Let that day be darkness ; let not God regard it from above, neither let the light shine upon it.
Page 476 - I enjoin and require that no ecclesiastic, missionary, or minister of any sect whatsoever, shall ever hold or exercise any station or duty whatever in the said College ; nor shall any such person ever be admitted for any purpose, or as a visitor, within .the premises appropriated to the purposes of the said college...
Page 178 - Let darkness and the shadow of death stain it; let a cloud dwell upon it; let the blackness of the day terrify it. 6 As for that night, let darkness seize upon it; let it not be joined unto the days of the year; let it not come into the number of the months.
Page 608 - Farewell the tranquil mind ! Farewell content ! Farewell the plumed troop, and the big wars, That make ambition virtue ! O, farewell ! Farewell the neighing steed, and the shrill trump, The spirit-stirring drum, the ear-piercing fife, The royal banner ; and all quality. Pride, pomp, and circumstance of glorious war...

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