Pioneer Life, Or, Thirty Years a Hunter

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Stackpole Books, 2006 - Sports & Recreation - 173 pages
Known as the Pine Creek deerslayer of the Alleghenies, Philip Tome was a pioneer farmer who turned to deer hunting for survival. Hunting the headwaters of the Pine, Kettle, Sinnemahoning, and Allegheny Rivers, he shot with a .45 caliber Kentucky-style Flintlock rifle and practiced fire hunting, stalking, hounding, and stand hunting over salt licks. He also captured elk and hunted panthers and bears. The early beginnings of hunting conservation can be seen in Tome's changing emphasis from the kill to the outdoor experience. In addition to his reputation as a hunter, he was an interpreter for Seneca Indian Chiefs Cornplanter and Governor Blacksnake.

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This book is a must-read for anybody who loves the outdoors and is interested in the storied history of Western Pennsylvania. Philip Tome actually writes very well for being in the 18th century and the book is very easy to understand.

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Contents

Birth and Early Life
1
Hunting the Elk
7
Capturing a Live Elk
10
Face of the Country
17
Face of the Country continued
25
Danger from Rattlesnakes
31
Wolf and Bear Hunting
38
Another Elk Hunt
42
Reminiscences of Cornplanter
121
Indian Eloquence
128
APPENDIX
139
Who Was Philip Tome?
141
Tome Miscellany
149
Tomes in Warren County 1850 Census
152
Short Sketch of Cornplanter
153
Cornplanter Indians and Their Schools
155

ElkHunting on the Susquehanna
51
ElkHunting continued
61
Nature Habits and Manner of Hunting Elk
67
Elk and Bear Hunting in Winter
71
Hunting on the Clarion River
80
Hunting and Trapping
87
The Bear Its Nature and Habits
95
Hunting Deer at Different Seasons
102
Nature and Habits of the Panther Wolf and Fox
108
Rattlesnakes and Their Habits
112
Distinguished Lumbermen ETC
117
Lycoming County
156
Potter County
157
Tioga County
160
Warren County
162
Gazeteer of Towns etc
163
Gazetteer of Rivers Streams etc
164
Biographical Index
166
Tome Land Warrants for Lycoming County
168
Bibliography
171
Copyright

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Page xi - Then, upon one knee uprising, Hiawatha aimed an arrow ; Scarce a twig moved with his motion, Scarce a leaf was stirred or rustled, But the wary roebuck started, Stamped with all his hoofs together, Listened with one foot uplifted, Leaped as if to meet the arrow ; Ah ! the singing, fatal arrow, Like a wasp it buzzed and stung him...
Page 131 - Brother, you say there is but one way to worship and serve the Great Spirit ; if there is but one religion, why do you white people differ so much about it ? Why not all agree, as you can all read the book ? " Brother, we do not understand these things.
Page 131 - Brother, we do not understand these things. We are told that your religion was given to your forefathers, and has been handed down from father to son. We also have a religion, which was given to our forefathers and has been handed down to us, their children. We worship in that way. It teaches us to be thankful for all the favors we receive, to love each other and to be united. We never quarrel about religion.
Page 131 - We know these things to be true. Since He has made so great a difference between us in other things, why may we not conclude that he has given us a different...
Page 121 - When I was a child, I played with the butterfly, the grasshopper and the frogs; and as I grew up, I began to pay some attention and play with the Indian boys in the neighborhood, and they took notice of my skin being a different color from theirs, and spoke about it. I inquired of my mother the cause, and she told me that my father was a residenter in Albany, t I still eat my victuals out of a bark dish.
Page 131 - The Great Spirit does right. He knows what is best for his children; we are satisfied. Brother, we do not wish to destroy your religion or take it from you. We only want to enjoy our own. Brother, you say you have not come to get our land or our money, but to enlighten our minds. I will now tell you that I have been at your meetings and saw you collect money from the meeting.

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