American Agriculturist, Volume 3

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Geo. A. Peters, 1844 - Agriculture

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Page 254 - Among the means which have been employed to this end none have been attended with greater success than the establishment of boards (composed of proper characters) charged with collecting and diffusing information, and enabled by premiums and small pecuniary aids to encourage and assist a spirit of discovery and improvement.
Page 280 - ... before any premium shall be delivered, the person claiming the same, or to whom the same may be awarded, shall deliver in writing to the president of the society...
Page 320 - BY CUTHBERT W. JOHNSON. ADAPTED TO THE UNITED STATES BY GOUVERNEUR EMERSON. Illustrated by seventeen beautiful Engravings of Cattle, Horses, Sheep, the varieties of Wheat; Barley, Oats, Grasses, the Weeds of Agriculture, &c.
Page 94 - DEPARTMENT, DESCRIPTIONS OF MANY VALUABLE FRUITS, AND A CALENDAR OF WORK TO BE PERFORMED EACH . MONTH IN THE YEAR. THE WHOLE ADAPTED TO THE CLIMATE OF THE UNITED STATES. In one small volume, paper. Price only Twenty-five Cents.
Page 59 - What a curious and interesting subject for contemplation ! In the remains of an extinct animal world, England is to find the means of increasing her wealth in agricultural produce, as she has already found the great support of her manufacturing industry in fossil fuel, — the preserved matter of primeval forests, — the remains of a vegetable world.
Page 29 - ... winter and summer, obtain carbon through their leaves by absorbing carbonic acid which is not furnished by the barren soil on which they grow ; water is also absorbed and retained by their coriaceous or fleshy leaves with great force. They lose very little by evaporation, compared with other plants. On the other hand, how very small is the quantity of mineral substances which they withdraw from the soil during their almost constant growth in one year, in comparison with the quantity which one...
Page 124 - Boil one pound of good flour, a quarter of a pound of brown sugar, and a little salt, in two gallons of water, for one hour. When milk-warm, bottle it, and cork it close. It will be fit for use in twenty-four hours.- One pint of this yeast will make eighteen pounds of bread.
Page 254 - ... charged with collecting and diffusing information, and enabled by premiums and small pecuniary aids to encourage and assist a spirit of discovery and improvement. This species of establishment contributes doubly to the increase of improvement by stimulating to enterprise and experiment, and by drawing to a common center the results everywhere of individual skill and observation, and spreading them thence over the whole nation. Experience accordingly has shown that they are very cheap instruments...
Page 253 - It will not be doubted, that with reference either to individual or national welfare, agriculture is of primary importance. In proportion as nations advance in population, and other circumstances of maturity, this truth becomes more apparent ; and renders the cultivation of the soil more and more an object of public patronage. Institutions for promoting it, grow up supported by the public purse : And to what object can it be dedicated with greater propriety...
Page 280 - ... feeding the animal, as may be ; and also of the expense and product of the crop, or of increase in the value of the animal, with the view of showing accurately the profit of cultivating the crop, or feeding or fattening the animal.

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