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stone floor, over which its contents spread in a liquid stream. Meanwhile two other youngsters, perched on the table, were busily engaged in spooning out the contents of the next best pot, so that the view presented to Mrs Sempill at the moment of her return was of a nature altogether to afflict her with complete despair. She had now no hope of saving even a wreck of what had cost her so much trouble, and her first and most natural emotion was to resign the whole to that destruction to which it seemed to have been predestined. - Weel, weel, bairns,' said she, just take it all amang you. It's the first jelly I've made, and it will be the last.' She then sat patiently down beside the fire, and looked quietly on while the swarm of her offspring spooned away at the remains of the precious mess, of which, in five minutes, not one particle remained either upon table, or floor, or spoon, or pot, neither in the pan from which the liquid had been poured ; nor was there left, indeed, any memorial that such a thing as currantjelly had once been there, excepting here and there a streak across a cheek or a brow, and a general stickiness over most of the furniture of the room, including particularly all handles of doors and drawers, the cause of which must be obvious.

Such was the history of Mrs Sempill's first attempt at gentility. It is scarcely necessary to add, that her last recorded exclamation became a strict truth, and that she never again borrowed Mrs. Mitchell's brass pan.

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN.

1. God save our gracious Queen! Long may Victoria reign :

God save the Queen ! Send her victorious, Happy, and glorious, Long to reign over us,

God save the Queen !

2. O Lord our God arise, Scatter her enemies,

And make them fall ! Confound their politics, Frustrate their knavish tricks; On Thee our hopes we fix :

God save the Queen!

3. Thy choicest gifts in store, On her be pleased to pour,

Long may she reign! May she defend our laws, And ever give us cause, To sing, with heart and voice,

God save the Queen!

DICTATION EXERCISES ON PARTICULAR

WORDS.

The teacher is presumed to exercise his pupils in dictation from the reading lessons generally. But it has been thought desirable to give at the conclusion of this Standard and of the Series, exercises—first, on words apt to be confounded ; and secondly, miscellaneous exercises comprising different styles of writing.

Of course, you will put on coarse clothes for such dirty work.

The deer bad fine horns; but it cost so much, I thought it a dear bargain.

I will pay you your due before the dew falls to-night.
Will you dye my blue curtains brown?
I saw my poor horse fall down and die.
As I went up to pay my fare, I saw a fair lady in front of me.

I never walked so far before. It was not an easy feat for my feet to perform.

The fore-horse galloped all the four miles.

He went forth from the king's presence in the fourth year of his reign. The rain was falling; but he leaped on to his horse, seized the reins, and rode along the road to the town at full speed.

The parlour grate is a small grate, but the kitchen grate is a great one.

A hare is larger than a rabbit, and the hair on its coat is darker.

He was a hale old man, and did not mind the pelting hail.
The wound on the cow's heel will never heal, I fear.
Come here, my boy, and hear what I have to tell you.
I heard a story about a large herd of cattle.

Before Tom sailed on the sea, he went to see his grandfather, and sang a hymn to him.

When the duke saw the inn by the wayside, he went in and asked for dinner.

The mistress made a present to her little maid of an old dress.

When I meet poor John, I will order him a joint of meat from the butcher's.

I have something in my eye.
The new grocer knew the draper and the shoemaker.
A pale sickly girl brought in a pail of water.
Our boys went to play for an hour.
Every one knows which is the nose.

If you will give me a ripe pear, I will give you my new pair of scissors.

Wrap up the child in a shawl, and then go and rap at the door.

First the clergyman prays, and then he calls on us to sing a psalm of praise.

He read out of a book with a red cover.
It is quite right of Tom to try and write better than he does

now.

Mary stares in surprise to see how fast Joe runs up stairs.
The thief tried to steal four steel knives.

Mary sews neatly and so does Ann, while James sows potatoes in the field.

The mother told her little son to look at the sunshine.
A funny tale it was Frank told us about the tail of a dog.
One of the tall men won the race.
I will take you to see a large yew-tree.
Do not run too fast, you two little boys.
Harry ate no less than eight pears.

What ails the brewer? He not only brews strong ales, he drinks them too. Last night he fell down stairs, and got a terrible bruise.

When we made the ascent of the mountain, we did it with my father's assent. Our goat was bred not upon grass but

upon

bread. The field itself is in the borough, but the wood and the rabbitburrow are not.

The beech-tree stood on the sea-beach.
His head was bare, and he led a bear by a chain.
Where have you been? To buy a pint of beans.
Be sure you do not touch that bee, or it will sting you

The sky was blue, though the wind blew roughly.

If you do not bow your head as you pass under the tree, you will be caught by that low bough.

I want to buy the house by the river.

Just as I was sealing my letter, part of the ceiling of the room fell down.

The site I have chosen to build my house on is within sight of the town.

Close that box of clothes carefully.

The higher you climb up the mountains, the colder is the clime you reach, but you can hire a guide to shew you the road. My guide rode beside me.

He led his horse by the bridle, and so went on foot to the bridal of his sister. When we stood by the altar, I wished I could alter my position, and go on the other side.

The privy-council said they knew nothing about it, and could give no counsel in the matter.

The miller's coat was white, but covered with flour, and he had a flower in his button-hole.

The squirrel's fur was rubbed off against the bark of the firtree.

The principal man on the island said it was contrary to his principles to do such a thing.

He tied his boat to a stake, that the tide might not carry it off, and then went to the shop and bought a beef-steak.

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