Page images
PDF
EPUB

.

[ocr errors]

PAGE

Milton : College Exercise ; His Native Language

. 88

Waller :- His Last Verses

100

Marvel: – To his Coy Mistress

. 103

The Picture of T. C.

104

Death of the Protector

105

Royal Resolutions

109

Ballad

111

Nevile :- Plato Redivivus; Revolution in France

128

66

Same Subject

129

T. Burnet: – Sacred Theory; The World on Fire

191

South : — Sermons; Brevity of Speech ..

196

Swift :- Tale of a Tub; Interpretation of the Will

212

Brother Martin

217

Brother Jack

221

Battle of the Books; Bentley and Wotton

224

The Drapier's Letters; Wood's Copper

233

David and Goliath

235

Swallowing Fireballs

236

Excellent New Song

238

Pope :- Rape of the Lock; The Sylphs

243

The Dunciad; Conclusion

246

Shaftesbury: – Characteristics ; Hamlet

251

Mandeville : - Fable of the Bees ; Gin

- .

253

Clothes ; Dress

256

Anticipation of Adam Smith

. 260

Bolingbroke : - Letter to Windham; Character of Harley

265

The Pretender

267

Tickell: The Rebellion of 1715

277

Burke: Vindication of Natural Society ; Democracy

336

Thoughts on the Present Discontents; House of Commons . 339

Speech at Bristol (1780); Penal Laws against Roman Catholics 341

Speech on Nabob of Arcot; Devastation of the Carnatic 345

Reflections on French Revolution ; Hereditary Principle 347

Letter to Mr. Elliot; True Reform

348

Letters on a Regicide Peace; Right Way of making War 351

Cowper :- Table Talk; National Vice

375

Truth; Voltaire

. 376

Conversation; Meeting on the Road to Emmaus

377

66 Lines on his Mother's Picture

. 378

Darwin: — Botanic Garden; “ Flowers of the Sky”

383

The Compass

384

The Goddess of Botany

385

Conclusion of Address to the Nymphs of

Fire

387

Steam

389

Portland Vase

392

VOL II,

b

[ocr errors]

.

HISTORY

OF

ENGLISH LITERATURE.

MIDDLE AND LATTER PART OF THE SEVENTEENTH

CENTURY.

EXCLUDING from our view the productions of the last fifty or sixty years, as not yet ripe for the verdict of history, we may affirm that our national literature, properly so called, that is, whatever of our literature by right of its poetic shape or spirit is to be held as peculiarly belonging to the language and the country, had its noonday in the period comprehending the last quarter of the sixteenth and the first of the seventeenth century. But a splendid afternoon flush succeeded this meridian blaze, which may be said to have lasted for another half-century, or longer. Down almost to the Revolution, or at least to the middle of the reign of Charles II., our higher literature continued to glow with more or less of the colored light and the heart of fire which it had acquired in the age of Elizabeth and James. Some of the greatest of it indeed - as the verse of Milton and the prose poetry of Jeremy Taylor — was not given to the world till towards the close of the space we have just indicated. But Milton, and Taylor, and Sir Thomas Browne, and Cudworth, and Henry More, and Cowley, the most eminent of our English writers in the interval from the Restoration to the Revolution (if we except Dryden, the founder of a new school, and Barrow, whose writings, full as they are of thought, have not much of the poetical or untranslatable) were all of them, it is worthy of observation, born before the close of the reign of James I. Nor would the stormy time that followed be without its nurture for such minds. A boyhood or youth passed in the days of Shakspeare and Bacon, and a manhood in those of the Great Rebellion, was a training which could not fail to rear high powers to their highest capabilities.

SHIRLEY, AND THE END OF THE OLD DRAMA.

The chief glory of our Elizabethan literature, however, belongs almost exclusively to the time we have already gone over. The only other name that remains to be mentioned to complete our sketch of the great age of the Drama, is that of James Shirley, who was born about the year 1594, and whose first play, the comedy of The Wedding, was published in 1629. He is the author of about forty dramatic pieces which have come down to us.

Shirley,” observes Lamb, “ claims a place among the worthies of this period, not so much for any transcendent genius in himself, as that he was the last of a great race, all of whom spoke nearly the same language, and had a set of moral feelings and notions in

A new language and quite a new turn of tragic and comic interest came in with the Restoration.” 1 Of this writer, who survived till 1666, the merits and defects have been well stated, in a few comprehensive words, by Mr. Hallam :—“Shirley has no originality, no force in conceiving or delineating character, little of pathos, and less, perhaps, of wit; his dramas produce no deep impression in reading, and of course can leave none in the memory. But his mind was poetical : his better characters, especjally females, express pure thoughts in pure language ; he is never tumid or affected, and seldom obscure; the incidents succeed rapidly; the personages are numerous, and there is a general animation in the scenes, which causes us to read him with some pleas

common.

" 2 ure.

A preface by Shirley is prefixed to the first collection of part of the plays of Beaumont and Fletcher, which, as already mentioned, appeared in 1647. “ Now, reader,” he says, “ in this tragical age, where the theatre hath been so much out-acted, congratulate thy own happiness that, in this silence of the stage, thou hast a liberty to read these inimitable plays, - to dwell and converse in these immortal groves, — which were only showed our fathers in a conjuring-glass, as suddenly removed as represented.” At this time all theatrical amusements were prohibited ; and the publication of these and of other dramatic productions which were their property, or rather the sale of them to the booksellers, was resorted to by the players as a way of making a little money when thus cut off from 1 Specimens, ii. 119.

2 Lit. of Eur. iii. 345.

« PreviousContinue »