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As we drove out to the grounds, 8 miles from the village of Noatak, we soon came to the upper end of the race course, which, through its entire distance, was outlined by neatly trimmed stakes, set at intervals of 200 yards; from the top of each stake fluttered a red, white, and blue pennant, the work of the sewing class of the school. On the plateau, where the races started, we were met by the crowd of delegates, who were lined up there ready to give us a cheer. On the plateau was a tent over which floated a large American flag, also a “reindee flag,” the pride of the Noatak herders. This flag had a red reindeer on a white field with a blue border; this flag was about 10 feet square. The tent had a good stove in it, and it was reserved for the judges and secretaries, giving them a place where they could figure out the winners of the different events without freezing their fingers. After this reception we were escorted down the little creek bed, and as we turned a bend we saw the main camp before us. A large WELCOME sign was posted high on a tree whose branches had been trimmed. A blue and gilt pennant of large size, with NOATAK in big letters, with trees on each side (the Noatak symbol), floated over the main tent. Between two trees was hung an: other big reindeer flag, and on the most conspicuous tree floated the largest American flag that could be procured. The Eskimo delegates lived in the big tent, and visitors camped in their own tents all around. The Eskimo delegates had their mess and the white delegates had theirs. The cooking class of the Noatak school cooked and served our meals and were awarded the blue ribbon as cooks. The most impressive thing connected with the fair was the salute to the flag each evening. This was arranged by Mr. Maguire. At the beginning of the evening meeting in the big tent Mr. Maguire played a bugle call on the organ; then he began to play “My Country, 'tis of Thee.” From the back of the tent came a procession. In front marched two of the most prominent head herders, each carrying a 30–30 rifle. Next marched an old Eskimo carrying the flag. He was followed by two of the younger reindeer men with rifles. They lined up in front of the audience and then all sang the first verse of “My Country, 'tis of Thee.” During the entire verse the audience stood and held the right hand rigidly at salute. It was exceedingly impressive to see old, decrepit Eskimos, men and women, struggle to their feet and hold that salute. I noticed some of the old folks, who did not thoroughly understand the salute, holding their hand over their eyes, and I saw their lips move, as in prayer. There are no people who love and honor the Government more than do the Eskimos. At both fairs this year we organized the Reindeer Men's Association on an experimental basis. Each station is to organize a local club. Their rules for admission are to be very strict. At the fair every two years (for we plan to hold only one fair a year in this district) each local club will send its delegates to what we called the District Meeting. At this district meeting the local clubs, through their delegates, will elect a board of head herders to supervise their work for the two years. We would like to see each reindeer station in both the northwestern and the western districts organize such local clubs. Then we should be able to arrange for delegates from even the most remote districts to attend each fair. This would tend to bind all the districts together, and would pave the way for our final plan—the election of a board of head herders for all the reindeer men in Alaska, two of these men to receive salaries from the association. IEach member of a local club is to pay annual dues of $2.50. Of this the local club is to keep $1 toward local affairs (erection of a club house, etc.) and 50 cents is to be sent to the treasurer of the district, for district expenses, including

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A. NEW CANNERY BUILDINGS AT M ET LAKATLA.

B. SALM ON READY FOR CLEANING AND CANNING, MET LAKATLA CANNERY.

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B. A PILE DRIVER NEAR METLAKATLA.

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TRAINING

A. NURSES AT JUNEAU HOSPITAL (CENTER) AND NATIVE GIRLS IN AS NURSES.

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B. MAY POLE AT MET LAKATLA SCHOOL.

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