Stories of Classic Myths

Front Cover
Century Company, 1909 - Mythology, Greek - 195 pages

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Contents

I
3
III
51
IV
69
V
75
VI
91
VII
96
VIII
104
IX
113
X
119
XI
134
XII
140
XIII
152
XIV
157
Copyright

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Page 123 - That which is now a horse, even with a thought The rack dislimns, and makes it indistinct, As water is in water.
Page 177 - Sheer o'er the crystal battlements : from morn To noon he fell, from noon to dewy eve, A summer's day ; and with the setting sun Dropt from the zenith like a falling star...
Page 126 - QUEEN and huntress, chaste and fair, Now the sun is laid to sleep, Seated in thy silver chair, State in wonted manner keep: Hesperus entreats thy light, Goddess, excellently bright!
Page 127 - Earth, let not thy envious shade Dare itself to interpose : Cynthia's shining orb was made Heaven to clear when day did close. Bless us then with wished sight, Goddess excellently bright ! Lay thy bow of pearl apart, And thy crystal shining quiver ; Give unto the flying hart Space to breathe, how short soever : Thou that mak'st a day of night, Goddess excellently bright ! Cynthia's JRevels.
Page 179 - Or view the Lord of the unerring bow, The God of life, and poesy, and light — The Sun in human limbs array'd, and brow All radiant from his triumph in the fight; The shaft hath just been shot — the arrow bright With an immortal's vengeance; in his eye And nostril beautiful disdain, and might, And majesty, flash their full lightnings by Developing in that one glance the Deity.
Page 191 - Thetis all the gods were invited with the exception of Eris, or Discord. Enraged at her exclusion, the goddess threw a golden apple among the guests, with the inscription,
Page 181 - Because thou canst not be My mistress, I espouse thee for my tree: Be thou the prize of honour and renown; The deathless poet, and the poem crown. Thou shalt the Roman festivals adorn, And, after poets, be by victors worn.
Page 63 - To the ocean now I fly, And those happy climes that lie Where day never shuts his eye, Up in the broad fields of the sky. There I suck the liquid air, All amidst the gardens fair Of Hesperus, and his daughters three That sing about the golden tree.
Page 183 - How the pale Phoebe, hunting in a grove, First saw the boy Endymion, from whose eyes She took eternal fire that never dies; How she...
Page 184 - ... clouds at sunset or at dawn came over the countenance of Diana thus taken by surprise. Surrounded as she was by her nymphs, she yet turned half away, and sought with a sudden impulse for her arrows. As they were not at hand, she dashed the water into the face of the intruder, adding these words: "Now go and tell, if you can, that you have seen Diana unapparelled.

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