Ordinary Heroes and American Democracy

Front Cover
Yale University Press, 2003 - 301 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

II
1
III
12
IV
31
V
58
VI
84
VII
108
VIII
134
IX
159
X
183
XI
210
XII
236
XIII
257
XIV
295
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 14 - The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench, the hatter singing as he stands, The wood-cutter's song, the ploughboy's on his way in the morning, or at noon intermission or at sundown, The delicious singing of the mother, or of the young wife at work, or of the girl sewing or washing, Each singing what belongs to him or her and to none else, The day what belongs to the day — at night the party of young fellows, robust, friendly, Singing with open mouths their strong melodious songs.
Page 13 - I HEAR America singing, the varied carols I hear, Those of mechanics, each one singing his as it should be blithe and strong, The carpenter singing his as he measures his plank or beam, The mason singing his as he makes ready for work, or leaves off work, The boatman singing what belongs to him in his boat, the deckhand singing on the steamboat deck, The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench, the hatter singing as he stands, The wood-cutter's song, the ploughboy's on his way in the morning, or...
Page 5 - It is in vain to say that enlightened statesmen will be able to adjust these clashing interests, and render them all subservient to the public good.

Bibliographic information