Recollections and Reflections, Personal and Political: As Connected with Public Affairs, During the Reign of George III.

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1822 - Great Britain

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Page 105 - That in case the crown and imperial dignity of this realm shall hereafter come to any person not being a native of this kingdom of England this nation be not obliged to engage in any war for the defence of any dominions or territories which do not belong to the crown of England without the consent of Parliament.
Page 94 - England as by law established ; that, in case the crown and imperial dignity of this realm shall hereafter come to any person not being a native of this kingdom of England, this nation be not obliged to engage in any war for...
Page 95 - That no person who has an office or place of profit under the King, or receives a pension from the crown, shall be capable of serving as a member of the house of commons.
Page 389 - King possessed one art beyond any man he had ever known ; for that, by the familiarity of his intercourse, he obtained your confidence, procured from you your opinion of different public characters, and then availed himself of this knowledge to sow dissension.
Page 95 - That after the said limitation shall take effect as aforesaid no person born out of the kingdoms of England Scotland or Ireland or the dominions thereunto belonging (although he be [naturalized or] made a denizen (except such as [are1] born of English parents) shall be capable to be of the privy council! or a member of either House of Parliament...
Page 96 - Commissions be made Quamdiu se bene gesserint, and their salaries ascertained and established ; but upon the Address of both Houses of Parliament it may be lawful to remove them. That no pardon under the Great Seal of England be pleadable to an impeachment by the Commons in Parliament.
Page 25 - Every person in the fleet, who through cowardice, negligence, or disaffection, shall in time of action withdraw or keep back, or not come into the fight or engagement, or shall not do his utmost to take or destroy every ship which it shall be his duty to engage, and to assist and relieve...
Page 240 - The wide, th' unbounded prospect lies before me ; But shadows, clouds, and darkness rest upon it. Here will I hold. If there's a Power above us, (And that there is, all nature cries aloud Through all her works), he must delight in virtue, And that which he delights in must be happy.
Page 79 - Not contented with being wise, he would be thought a polite scholar, and a man of great erudition ; but has the misfortune never to succeed, except with those who are exceedingly ignorant ; for his historical knowledge is chiefly taken from tragedies, 79 wherein he is very deeply read ; and his classical learning extends no farther than a French translation.
Page 51 - ... and confidence ; it cannot be denied that he possesses some qualities of an able minister : yet view him in a different light, and our veneration will be somewhat abated. Talk with him concerning public or private business of a nice or delicate nature, he will be found confused, irresolute, continually rambling from the subject, contradicting himself almost every instant. Hear him speak in parliament...

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